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Indian diaspora in Britain significant to the country: Navtej Sarna

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Image source: asian-voice.com

London: The Indian diaspora in Britain are significant to the country since they contribute 6 percent to their GDP, despite being a mere 1.8 percent of Briatin’s population, said India’s new High Commissioner Navtej Sarna yesterday.

Addressing members of the House of Commons and House of Lords at a welcome extended to him, he also went on to highlight it was more expensive to study at Britain’s Oxford and Cambridge universities than institutions in other countries, but Indians were willing to pay extra for the quality of education offered by Oxbridge.

What was preventing more students from India in coming to such centres of excellence, said Sarna, was “visa difficulties are making the other destinations more attractive”. Among these other destinations, he specifically mentioned Australia and New Zealand.

The event at the Westminster Palace, which houses the British parliament, was jointly hosted by the Indo-British and Commonwealth All Party Parliamentary Groups. (IANS)

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Scientists Trace The Origin of ‘Zero’ to Ancient Indian Manuscript

Scientists have relied on carbon dating technology to determine the world’s oldest recorded derivation of the zero that is now used by people world over

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Scientists have now traced the origin of zero to the Bakhshali manuscripts that date from the 3rd or the 4th century. Pixabay

Oxford, September 16, 2017 : The eminent Indian mathematician Brahmagupta has been credited globally for writing the first-ever text that described zero as a number in 628 AD. According to Professor Marcus Du Sautoy of the University of Oxford, the creation of zero has to be credited as the “greatest breakthrough” in mathematics. But carbon dating of an ancient text has pushed the story of zero’s origin back by 500 years!

Scientists have now traced the origin of zero to the Bakhshali manuscripts that date from the 3rd or the 4th century- over 500 years older than previously thought, which makes it the world’s oldest recorded derivation of the zero that is now used by people world over.

The new search results stemming from the manuscript assert an earlier reference to the symbol of zero that is considerably older than the previously known inscription on a temple in Gwalior, India dating the ninth-century.

We present six astounding facts about the symbol ‘0’,

  1. The Bakhshali script is a fragmentary text, inscribed on 70 leaves of the bark of the birch tree and contains material from three different periods- 224-383 AD, 680-779 AD and 885-993 AD. This also raises critical questions about how the text was clubbed together as a single document.
  2. The ancient text was named after the village it was found buried in. The Bakhshali manuscript was first found in 1881 in a village near Peshawar (present-day Pakistan) called Bakshali. The text was discovered by a local farmer, and was later acquired by the indologist Rudolf Hoernle who later submitted it to the Bodleian Library in Oxford.
  3. Translations of the Bakhshali manuscript, which was originally written in a form of Sanskrit, reveal that the text was guidance manual for merchants practicing their trade along the Silk Road. The transcript includes multiple practical arithmetic exercises and a proto-type of algebra.
  4. The zero is nowhere used as a ‘number’ having its own value in the Bakhshali manuscript but merely as a placeholder in the system of numeration. This can be better understood by examining the position of ‘0’ in ‘205’ which does not indicate tens. Here, absence of a value, in other words the answer to a problem which is zero is left blank as a way to distinguish 1 from 10 and 100.
  5. Multiple ancient civilizations had evolved an independent placeholder that held no independent value –
  • about 5,000 years ago, the Babylonians made use of a double wedge to denote absence
  • Mayans incorporated a shell to indicate ‘nothing’ in their ancient calendar system

However, the Bakhshali manuscript featured the first ‘dot’ symbol that eventually transformed into the ‘0’ symbol with the hollow centre that is used today.

  1. The Bakhshali script was the first to explore the possibility to use zero as a number- this was later described in a text called Brahmasphutasiddhanta, which had been written and compiled in 626 AD by the great Indian astronomer and mathematician Brahmagupta.

The development of zero dramatically changed the field of mathematics, supplementing an implausible range of further work, including the notion of infinity, calculus, digital technology and also some of the larger questions of cosmology about the beginning of the Universe and how its existence might disappear in future.

ALSO READ India Invented Principles of Calculus 250 Years Before Newton. Indian Scholars from a Kerala School Did it

According to a report by The Guardian, the head of the Bodleian Library, Richard Ovenden was quoted as saying that these astounding research results highlight the rich and ancient scientific tradition of South Asia and also draw attention to the Western bias that often left the contributions of these scholars overlooked and ignored.


 

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Indian-Origin Doctor Arpan Doshi to Become Britain’s Youngest Physician to Start Working at Hospital

An Indian-origin medical graduate broke the record to start work in the UK by 17 days

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Indian-Origin Doctor Arpan Doshi
A Sheffield University graduate becomes the youngest physician to work in Britain. Wikimedia
  • An Indian-origin doctor breaks record and becomes the youngest physician in Britain to start working 
  • He received scholarship of 13,000 pounds from University of Sheffield
  • He will start his two-year training at York teaching hospital in August

London, July 21, 2017: An Indian origin doctor named Arpan Doshi is becoming Britain’s youngest physician to begin working at a hospital located in the northeast of England. He completed his graduation with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degree from the University of Sheffield on Monday. Doshi, whose age is 21 years and 335 days, will start working in York as a junior doctor the following month.

The record of the youngest doctor starting work in the UK was broken by him by only 17 days. He said that he didn’t even realize that he became the youngest individual to qualify till his friend checked the internet. He has not told his parents till now but he knows they’ll be proud of his achievement, mentioned PTI report.

ALSO READ: Indian-origin Doctor Balvinder Mehat held for ‘illegal’ Circumcision of 3-month-old Baby in London

He was sent to a school situated in Gandhinagar, Gujrat, till the age of 13 after which Bharat Doshi, his father who was a mechanical engineer, was employed in Aix en Provence for an international project causing his whole family to shift to France.

Arpan, in his statement, said that he realized that he had already studied the things being taught in his school in France which made him skip a year.

Soon after his 17th birthday, he started sending his applications to universities. He faced one rejection but the other three accepted him. The University of Sheffield offered him a 13,000 pounds scholarship after being impressed with his credentials.

To fund his doctorate degree, he received some financial aid given by his parents but he also had to work part-time as a local school’s lunch supervisor and in the service of careers.

“My dream is to become a heart surgeon but it is a very competitive field. It is not really a surprise I have ended up as a doctor,” he said.

Arpan broke the record of Rachael Faye Hill, the former youngest doctor eligible to qualify, who graduated from University of Manchester with a medical degree when her age in 2010 was 21 years and 352 days.

Doshi, with his doctorate degree, is all set to break her record in August when he begins with his training of two years at York teaching hospital as a junior doctor.

-prepared by Harsimran Kaur of Newsgram. Twitter Hkaur1025


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Indian Origin Girl Rajgauri Pawar tops Mensa IQ test in front of Britain

Pawar has outshined the greatest scientists on earth to achieve the prestigious feat, which is recorded by only one percent of those who appear for the elite society’s entry paper.

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Rajgauri Pawar outshines Einstein and Hawkings, Source- Twitter

London, May 15, 2017: Indian-origin girl Rajgauri Pawar has aced Stephen Hawking and Einstein in British Mensa IQ Test to get the IQ of 162 which is the highest IQ possible for the under-18 group.

This 12-year-old girl appeared in the British Mensa IQ test a month ago and has scored 2 points higher than the world renowned scientists.

Pawar has been invited to join the coveted Mensa IQ academy as a member.

It is believed that Mensa is the largest and oldest high-IQ society in the world. Anyone who can demonstrate an IQ in the top 2 percent of the population, measured by a recognized or approved IQ testing process can become the member of this society, mentioned TOI report.

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According to Mensa, she is one of only 20,000 people to achieve the score worldwide.

Pawar said, “I was a little nervous before the test but it was fine and I’m really pleased to have done so well.”

Pawar has outshined the greatest scientists on earth to achieve the prestigious feat, which is recorded by only one percent of those who appear for the elite society’s entry paper.

Pawar’s father, Dr. Suraj Kumar Pawar said, “this wouldn’t have been possible without the efforts of her teachers and the support which my daughter enjoys every day at school.” Rajagauri’s proud teachers and

Rajagauri’s proud teachers and elated schoolmates at Altrincham Girls’ Grammar School cannot stop celebrating the big feat achieved by their student. “We are very proud of Rajgauri,” said Andrew Barry, her maths teacher. “Everybody is delighted. She is a very well-liked student, and we all expect great things from her!”.

In 2016, another Indian-origin boy, Dhruv Talati attained the coveted score of 162 to ace Stephen and Einstein.  Dhruv Talati, who lives in Ilford, London topped the high-IQ society’s Cattell B paper.

These young buds are being named as the most intelligent people across the globe.

– prepared by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram, Twitter: @NikitaTayal6