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Lord Krishna temple opens in Malaysia

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple of Devotion & Understanding will open in Seberang Jaya, (Penang, Malaysia) on August 29.

The RM10 million three-storey octagonal temple is receiving the final touches preparatory to its consecration ceremony on August 29. – Pic from the Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple of Devotion and Understanding Facebook page
The RM10 million three-storey octagonal temple is receiving the final touches preparatory to its consecration ceremony on August 29. – Pic from the Sri Sri Radha Krishna Temple of Devotion and Understanding Facebook page

The 10 million Malaysian Ringgit octagonal-shaped multi-storey unique temple with 16 chatris (ornate dome-shaped pavilions) is set to become a state landmark and the first of its kind. The temple is receiving final touches before the “kumbabeseigam” (consecration ceremony) that is to be held tomorrow.

Established by International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), the temple also proposes to instruct devotees on yoga, chanting, spirituality, etc.; run an education center; provide free vegetarian food and include a Srila Prabhupada Gallery.

The temple was envisioned by the society’s founder, CC Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, during a visit to Malaysia in 1971. ISKCON Malaysia, launched in 1980, now has over 20 registered branches and over nine preaching centers.

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Stanford Study Ranks India among the Laziest People in the World

A recent study by a group of researchers at Stanford have revealed that Indians are among the laziest people in the world

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Indians average just 4,297 steps a day. Wikimedia
  • A Stanford study has ranked India 39 in the world for the laziest people 
  • China, and particularly Hong Kong, has the most active people
  • The research also found out that Indian women walk even less than men

July 17, 2017: Researchers at Stanford University carried out a study on 46 countries to find out the levels of laziness. In its finding, Indians ranked 39 and thus among the laziest people.

Indian people average only about 4,297 steps a day. It was also observed that women in India walk much less than men. While men registered an average of 4,606 steps daily, women averaged 3,684 steps.

The world average is 4,961 steps. The Americans stood at an average of 4,77,4 steps daily.

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The most active people, according to the research, are the Chinese and mainly the ones in Hong Kong. Other notably active people are from Ukraine and Japan. The people in these countries walk more than 6,000 steps daily, mentioned ANI report.

With a daily average of just 3,513 steps, the Indonesians ranked as the laziest people in the world. Other laziest countries include Malaysia and Saudi Arabia. These countries have an average of fewer than 3,900 steps.

The researchers at Stanford University installed step-counters in smartphones and used that information for the research. 700,000 people from 46 different countries were part of the research, which has been published in the journal called Nature.

– Prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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Artists give Malaysian Twist to traditional Chinese Ink Paintings

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Traditional Chinese Ink Painting, Pixabay

Malaysia, April 11, 2017: While traditional Chinese ink paintings are usually associated with scenic landscapes such as mountains, hills, rivers, bamboo forest, pine trees or flowers, a group of local Chinese ink artists have given a Malaysian twist to such Chinese paintings.

They are featured at the Ink Sense Chinese Painting Group Exhibition at contemporary art space L’Atelier Rouge in Jaya One in Petaling Jaya. Six artists are participating in this exhibition.

Collectors and art enthusiasts can spot a distinctly Malaysian flavour or theme in this exhibition, with some works proudly drawing inspiration from traditional kampung settings, rubber trees and batik prints.

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At the show, Ng Yen Tee, 45, whose background is western art, has four artworks based on traditional Malay wooden houses. In her “harmony-centred” works, Ng contemplates on the idea of “home” – for a family and a multi-cultural nation. She uses three colours in her batik designs to symbolise the three dominant races in Malaysia. She also infuses her paintings with a dark ink texture to create a strong contrast for these colours to make each painting “visually more attractive”. Six years ago, she took up Chinese painting lessons from an art teacher in Klang.

Graphic designer Yon Chuk Yim, 48, feels that Chinese ink artworks need not be restricted to traditional themes. She explores a mixture of contemporary techniques, such as color splashes, and overlaying colors over ink.

Yon, whose mentor is Yee Sze Fook, a full time artist, likes to paint on the whim rather than follow a theme.

Veteran artist Shirley Chu Siow Eng, 67, born in Fujian province in China, Chu migrated with her parents to Malaysia when she was five. Choosing rubber trees as her theme, she recalls her younger days when her father explained how rubber plantations provided jobs and resources for the local economy.

Chong Buck Tee, 67, a graduate of the Malaysian Institute of Art 1972, who is one of Malaysia’s foremost Chinese brush painting artists, with a career span of more than 30 years, who has won numerous awards at home and abroad and is currently the president of the Bakti Art Centre in Ampang, and advisor of the Selangor and Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur Shui-Mo Art Society, loves to paint landscapes. At this exhibition, his striking work, Mystic Landscape, has a refreshingly modern feel. “My works are imaginary but based on what I have seen – either from my travels or from pictures,” says Chong.

Others taking part in the exhibition are Dr Kok Ming Fong and Karen Ng.

– Prepared by Upama Bhattacharya. Twitter @Upama_myself

 

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Malaysians protest against the policies of US President Donald Trump

About 61 per cent of Malaysia's population of 31 million people adhere to Islam

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Donald Trump at Press Conference- Image Courtesy- Wikimedia

Kuala Lumpur, Feb 3, 2017: Dozens of Malaysians took to the streets of the Malaysian capital to denounce the policies of the new United States President.

The protest on Friday, held in front of the US Embassy, was joined by about 100 people, mostly Malaysian Muslims and small numbers of Chinese and Indian protesters, Efe news reported.

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Around 2 p.m. (local time), they began their rally, which consisted of carrying banners, making speeches and shouting slogans.

A man with a megaphone led the group in chanting “Long Live Islam” in Malaysian and “No Muslim Ban” and “No Wall No Ban”.

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Their placards carried the same message of “#NoWallNoBan” and “#NoMuslimBan”, referencing the controversial executive order issued this week by Donald Trump banning entry to the US for nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries including Syria, Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen.

Many protesters were members of various Malaysian opposition parties and NGOs, with some from the Socialist Alternative group.

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Muhammad Emuzufar, that group’s leader, said that his organisation opposes racism, homophobia and Trump’s alleged anti-Islam stance, and criticized the US president as representing “the worst face of capitalism”.

Around 40 police officers were standing guard near the protest area, but there were no reports of arrests.

About 61 per cent of Malaysia’s population of 31 million people adhere to Islam, with most followers being ethnic Malays. (IANS)