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More than 62,000 Kashmiri Pandit families have migrated from Valley since early 1990s

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Due to onset of militancy in the State of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) in the early 1990s, more than 62,000 Kashmiri Pandit families have migrated from the Valley.

“Present number of registered Kashmiri migrant families is about 62,000. About 40,668 registered Kashmiri migrant families are residing in Jammu; about 19,338 registered Kashmiri migrant families are living in Delhi and about 2,000 families are settled in other states,” informed  Minister of State for Home Affairs, Haribhai Parathibhai Chaudhary to the Lok Sabha.

Recently, Kashmiri Pandits held a rally at Jantar Mantar in New Delhi to raise a voice for the all pervasive demand for the ‘Homeland.’

The protest also saw people  echoing the concern over the absence of Kashmiri Pandit voice in the ongoing dialogue between the Centre and J&K state.

“The crucial missing part in this jigsaw puzzle is the Kashmiri Pandits themselves. The government is talking about us, but they aren’t asking us. They should speak to us and every time a separatist sneezes, they should not catch cold. Mr Mufti promises composite towns one day and the next day he backs out. The government should not get scared by a hundred odd people and should stand still on a decision,”  Rashneek Kher,  from Roots in Kashmir, told NewsGram during the protest.

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Pollution Severe In Delhi In Spite Of Odd-Even Scheme: SC

SC says despite odd-even scheme, pollution in Delhi became severe

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Odd-Even scheme
In spite of Odd-Even vehicle rationing scheme, pollution has reached a severe level. Pixabay

The Supreme Court on Friday said in spite of Odd-Even vehicle rationing scheme, pollution has reached a severe level, and again called the Chief Secretaries of Delhi, Punjab, Harayana and Uttar Pradesh, to report on measures taken to curb air pollution particularly related to stubble burning.

A bench headed by Justice Arun Mishra said, “Do not give exemption to two-wheelers, and it will work.”

During the hearing, the judges scrutinized the Odd-Even scheme of the Delhi government in respect of air quality index data gathered in the past two years. The judges queried the Delhi government counsel, senior advocate Mukul Rohtagi, what purpose the scheme served by keeping out cars which contribute mere three per cent of the total pollution.

Odd-even scheme in Delhi
The court observed the data presented by the authorities suggest the Odd-Even scheme had hardly any effect on improving air quality. Pixabay

The court observed that Delhi’s local pollution is a major problem, if stubble burning which contributes 40 per cent is kept out.

“According to the authorities, stubble burning has reduced to somewhere near five per cent now…we are concerned about Delhi’s local air pollution. What is the government doing?”

The court observed the data presented by the authorities suggest the Odd-Eeven scheme had hardly any effect on improving air quality. “Question is what are you gaining by this scheme?” observed the court.

Also Read- Pollution Problem in Delhi Likely to Influence Upcoming Delhi Assembly Polls

Further commenting on the social aspect of the Odd-Even scheme, the court said “Odd-Even will only affect the lower middle class but not the affluent ones since they have multiple cars… Odd-Even isn’t a solution, but public transport could be. But nothing has been done about that”, said the court.

The hearing on the matter will continue on November 25. (IANS)