Wednesday April 25, 2018

Obesity has association with blood clots seen in children

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New York: Obesity has an association with the formation of blood clots in the veins of children and adolescents, says a new study.

Obesity, as determined by body mass index, was a statistically significant predictor of blood clot formation in juveniles, the study showed.

The association between obesity and venous thromboembolism (VTE) — the formation of blood clots — can cause both acute and chronic health problems if left untreated, the researchers warned.

Elizabeth Halvorson, assistant professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina, US. expressed the major findings of the study.

Our study demonstrated an association between obesity and VTE in children, which should be explored further in larger future studies,

This is important because the incidence of pediatric VTE has increased dramatically over the last 20 years and childhood obesity remains highly prevalent in the US,” she added.

For the study, the researchers conducted a retrospective chart review of patients at Wake Forest Baptist’s Brenner Children’s Hospital between January 2000 and September 2012. They identified 88 patients between ages 2-18 who confirmed cases of VTE.

After adjusting for the other risk factors – among them bloodstream infection and time spent in an intensive care unit – the researchers found a small but statistically significant association between obesity and VTE.

The research was published in the journal Hospital Pediatrics.

(Inputs from IANS)

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Obesity Linked To Heart Rhythm Disorder

Obesity raises the risk of irregular heart rate

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Stop Obesity
Stop Obesity. Pixabay

Obesity may increase risk of developing a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, says a study of nearly 70,00 patients.

The findings, published in the journal American Journal of Cardiology, showed that people with obesity had a 40 per cent higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation than people without obesity.

Also Read: Obesity may affect a child’s liver

The results suggest that for patients with both obesity and atrial fibrillation, losing weight has the potential to help treat and manage their atrial fibrillation, said Andrew Foy, Assistant Professor at Penn State College of Medicine in the US.

“If you have both atrial fibrillation and obesity, treating obesity will go a long way in treating and managing your atrial fibrillation,” Foy said.

Our weight must be in our control.
Weight must be in control. Pixabay

“And if you have obesity, and lose weight through diet, exercise, or even surgery, that will help reduce your risk of developing chronic conditions like atrial fibrillation,” he added.

Atrial fibrillation happens when the electrical currents in the heart go haywire and the top chambers of the heart quiver or flutter.

The condition puts patients at a higher risk for developing other heart complications.

While previous research has linked obesity and atrial fibrillation, Foy said he wanted to explore the connection in a larger sample of younger patients.

Also Read: SURVEY – Obesity Becoming A Health Crisis Among The Asia-Pacific Children

The researchers followed a group of 67,278 patients — half with obesity and half without — for eight years. The average participant age was 43.8 and nearly 77 per cent were women.

People with obesity are 40 per cent more likely to develop atrial fibrillation, while they are 45 per cent and 51 per cent more likely to develop hypertension or diabetes, respectively, the findings showed.

The researchers also found that people with obesity are almost just as likely to develop atrial fibrillation as people with hypertension or diabetes.  IANS

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