Monday April 6, 2020

Paracetamol intake during pregnancy is hazardous for unborn baby boys, says a new study

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

A new study, which appeared in the journal, Science Translational Medicine, has shown that prolonged use of paracetamol during pregnancy may hinder the testosterone production in unborn baby boys.

As reported by IANS, Rod Mitchell, a clinical research at University of Edinburgh, stated, “This study adds to existing evidence that prolonged use of paracetamol in pregnancy may increase the risk of reproductive disorders in male babies.”

“We would advise that pregnant women should follow current guidance that the painkiller be taken at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time,” Mitchell added.

According to the report, the study observed the effects of paracetamol on testosterone production in mice that had grafts of human testicular tissue. These grafts have been shown to mimic how the developing testes grow and function during pregnancy.

The mice were given a daily dose of paracetamol over a period of seven days. The amount of testosterone produced by the human tissue was measured after an hour of the final dose of paracetamol. It was found that there was no effect on testosterone production following 24 hours of paracetamol treatment.

However, after seven days of exposure, the amount of testosterone production was reduced by 45 per cent.

“Further research is required to establish the mechanism by which paracetamol might have this effect,” the team concluded.

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Pregnant Women Having High Blood Pressure Have Greater Heart Disease Risk: Study

The study suggests that all women be screened for preeclampsia throughout their pregnancy and that treatment be given to those with preeclampsia within five years after birth

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Approximately two to eight per cent of pregnant women worldwide are diagnosed with preeclampsia, a complication characterised by high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy in women whose blood pressure had been normal. Pixabay

Women with high blood pressure in their first pregnancy have a greater risk of heart attack or cardiovascular death, researchers have warned.

“Women who were diagnosed with preeclampsia tended also to have a history of chronic high blood pressure, gestational diabetes and kidney disease and other medical conditions,” said study lead author Mary Downes Gastrich, Associate Professor at Rutgers University in the US.

Approximately two to eight per cent of pregnant women worldwide are diagnosed with preeclampsia, a complication characterised by high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy in women whose blood pressure had been normal.

Doctors haven’t identified a single cause, but it is thought to be related to insufficiently formed placental blood vessels. Preeclampsia is also the cause of 15 per cent of premature births in the US.

For the findings, the researchers analysed cardiovascular disease in 6,360 women, age 18 to 54, who were pregnant for the first time and diagnosed with preeclampsia in New Jersey hospitals from 1999 to 2013 and compared them to pregnant women without preeclampsia.

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Women with high blood pressure in their first pregnancy have a greater risk of heart attack or cardiovascular death, researchers have warned. Pixabay

They found that those with the condition were four times more likely to suffer a heart attack or cardiovascular death and more than two times more likely to die from other causes during the 15-year study period.

The study suggests that all women be screened for preeclampsia throughout their pregnancy and that treatment be given to those with preeclampsia within five years after birth.

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“Medication such as low-dose aspirin also may be effective in bringing down blood pressure as early as the second trimester,” Gastrich said. (IANS)