Monday May 21, 2018

Paracetamol intake during pregnancy is hazardous for unborn baby boys, says a new study

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

A new study, which appeared in the journal, Science Translational Medicine, has shown that prolonged use of paracetamol during pregnancy may hinder the testosterone production in unborn baby boys.

As reported by IANS, Rod Mitchell, a clinical research at University of Edinburgh, stated, “This study adds to existing evidence that prolonged use of paracetamol in pregnancy may increase the risk of reproductive disorders in male babies.”

“We would advise that pregnant women should follow current guidance that the painkiller be taken at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time,” Mitchell added.

According to the report, the study observed the effects of paracetamol on testosterone production in mice that had grafts of human testicular tissue. These grafts have been shown to mimic how the developing testes grow and function during pregnancy.

The mice were given a daily dose of paracetamol over a period of seven days. The amount of testosterone produced by the human tissue was measured after an hour of the final dose of paracetamol. It was found that there was no effect on testosterone production following 24 hours of paracetamol treatment.

However, after seven days of exposure, the amount of testosterone production was reduced by 45 per cent.

“Further research is required to establish the mechanism by which paracetamol might have this effect,” the team concluded.

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Depression in Males Can Reduce The Pregnancy Chances, says Study

Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 per cent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression.

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Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.
Depression in males can reduce the chances of pregnancy. Pixabay

Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.

The study showed that couples in which the male partner had major depression were 60 per cent less likely to conceive and give birth than those in which the male partner did not have major depression.

On the other hand, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of birth.

In addition, intake of a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) was also linked to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility, the study appearing in the journal Fertility and Sterility, noted.

However, SSRIs, another class of antidepressants, were not linked to pregnancy loss. Neither depression in the female partner nor the use of any other class of antidepressant were linked to lower pregnancy rates.

 

“Our study provides infertility patients and their physicians with new information to consider when making treatment decisions,” said Esther Eisenberg, at National Institutes of Health’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in Maryland, US.

Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, according to a study.
On the other hand, depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of birth. Pixabay

Citing previous studies, the authors noted that 41 per cent of women seeking fertility treatments have symptoms of depression.

Another study of men seeking in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatments reported that nearly 50 per cent experienced depression.

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For the study, the team analysed data for 1,650 women and 1,608 men to evaluate the potential influence of depression in couples seeking non-IVF treatments.

Among the women, 5.96 per cent were rated as having active major depression, compared to 2.28 per cent of the men.

Women using non-SSRIs were roughly 3.5 times as likely to have a first-trimester pregnancy loss, compared to those not using antidepressants. (IANS)

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