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Pooductive: socialise while using toilet

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Photo Credit: www.theguardian.com
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New York: How do you kill time while using the toilet? Now you can socialise while answering the nature’s call, thanks to a new app.

Photo Credit: www.digitalspy.com
Photo Credit: www.digitalspy.com

Created by two students, Pooductive is a free app that facilitates one-on-one or group chats. You can also choose to message people nearby or be connected with users in other cities or countries, mashable.com reported.

“The fact that there is only little to do whilst tending to ‘number two’ is common knowledge, and truly a first world problem,” the developers wrote on Pooductive’s website.

“Think of it as a magical place where people from around the globe can anonymously meet to enjoy their time of zen, peace and tranquillity together, by conversing, philosophising and sharing ideas with each other,” they said.

“You could simply call it a messaging app if you want to, but it is so much more,” the developers said.

There is a “songs that describe it” feature, which you may find either hilarious or disgusting depending on your sense of humour.

But the developers are serious. They hoped to use the app to have a positive impact on the world — by partnering with charities that promote sanitation and clean water in developing countries.

(IANS)

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New AI system can diagnose prostate cancer just good as pathologists

"The system was programmed to learn and gradually improve how it interpreted the samples. Our result show that the diagnosis the AI reported was at a level comparable to that of a pathologist"

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Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
  • This new AI can identify cancer just as accurately as a pathology lab
  • This app can overcome the shortage of pathologists
  • The app is very useful and revolutionary

Researchers have developed a new learning artificial intelligence (AI) system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist.

Chronic diseases are not yet included in cancer prevention schemes.
New mobile app can detect cancer.

According to the researchers, this holds out the possibility of streamlining and eliminating variation in the process of cancer diagnosis. It may also help overcome any local shortage of trained pathologists.

“This is not going to replace a human pathologist. We still need an experienced pathologist to take responsibility for the final diagnosis,” said lead author Hongqian Guo from the Nanjing University in China.

Also Read: Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

“What it will do is help pathologists make better, faster diagnosis, as well as eliminating the day-to-day variation in judgement which can creep into human evaluations,” Guo added.

For the study, presented at the 33rd European Association of Urology Congress in Copenhagen, researchers took 918 prostate whole mount pathology section samples from 283 patients, and ran these through the analysis system, with the software gradually learning and improving diagnosis.

These pathology images were subdivided into 40,000 smaller samples; 30,000 of these samples were used to ‘train’ the software, the remaining 10,000 were used to test accuracy.

The results showed an accurate diagnosis in 99.38 percent of cases (using a human pathologist as a ‘gold standard’), which is effectively as accurate as the human pathologist.

The app is just as effective as a pathologist. Pixabay

They were also able to identify different Gleason Grades in the pathology sections using AI; ten whole mount prostate pathology sections have been tested so far, with similar Gleason Grade in the AI and human pathologist’s diagnosis. The group has not started testing the system with human patients.

“The system was programmed to learn and gradually improve how it interpreted the samples. Our result show that the diagnosis the AI reported was at a level comparable to that of a pathologist. “Furthermore, it could accurately classify the malignant levels of prostate cancer,” Guo added. IANS

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