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Recreated horror: App to show consequences of Hiroshima bombing on your hometown

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

An app which allows one to envision and map out the scale of destruction of a nuclear bombing, similar to what happened in the Hiroshima blasts.

Photo credit: genius.com
Photo credit: genius.com

This app, Nukemap, developed by a historian of science, Alex Wellerstein, simulates the consequences of a nuclear bombing. It shows you the destruction which can happen if a bomb like the Little Boy bomb (codename of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima)—or more developed and more destructive bombs—were to be dropped in the fallout area or location mapped.

It shows you what will happen to your home if such a disastrous thing were to happen.

According to the app features, users can select from a range of locations, preset bombs (like Little Boy and Fat Man, which were dropped on Japan), choose exactly how the bomb is to be dropped and detonated—and you get to see the effects plotted on a map and the casualties counted up.

Public Radio International (PRI), a global non-profit media company, developed a similar application which shows the effects of the Hiroshima bombing on any other location.

According to a report prepared by the US Army one year after the Hiroshima attack, in the actual bombing about 66,000 people perished, 69,000 were injured and tens of thousands more were affected by radiation disease.

How hard is it to imagine this disaster and its destructive power once again?

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Japan commemorates 71st Anniversary of Hiroshima Nuclear Bombing on August 6

Washington argued the attacks were necessary to bring about a quicker end to the war and six days after the Nagasaki attack, Japan surrendered, ending the war

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center left, puts his arm around Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, center right, after they and fellow G7 foreign ministers laid wreaths at the cenotaph at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, Japan. Image source: VOA
  • The Hiroshima bombing killed around 140,000 people- either instantly or from radiation burns in the immediate aftermath
  • Another bomb was dropped on the port city of Nagasaki three days later, killing an estimated 70,000 residents
  • Obama was the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site, this year in 2016

About 50,000 people attended a ceremony on Saturday, August 6, 2016, at Hiroshima’s Peace Park near the bomb’s epicenter, marking the 71st anniversary of the U.S. nuclear bombing of Hiroshima that led to the end of World War.

Mayor Kazumi Matsui called on world leaders to visit the site, like U.S. President Barack Obama did in May, 2016.

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Like Obama, Matsui said that such visits “will surely etch the reality of the atomic bombings in each heart.”

The Hiroshima bombing killed around 140,000 people either instantly or from radiation burns in the immediate aftermath.

Hiroshima after the bombing. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Hiroshima after the bombing. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Another bomb was dropped on the port city of Nagasaki three days later, killing an estimated 70,000 residents.

Washington argued the attacks were necessary to bring about a quicker end to the war.  Six days after the Nagasaki attack, Japan surrendered, ending the war.

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When he visited the site, Obama said, “We have a shared responsibility to look directly in the eye of history. We must ask what we must do differently to curb such suffering again. We must re-imagine our connection to one another as members of the human race.”

Obama is the first sitting U.S. president to visit the bomb site.  He did not offer an apology for the bombing.  He had said he would not revisit then president Harry Truman’s decision.(VOA)

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