Sunday October 22, 2017

REVEALED: Marilyn Monroe was killed by a CIA operative

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

In an explosive revelation, Normand Hodges, a retired CIA has come out with the controversial claim of assassinating American actress and model Marilyn Monroe.

The fiery confession was made during his stay at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in Norfolk, Virginia, while he was on deathbed languishing from an unspecified illness.

Expelling the reason for murdering Monroe, the CIA sleuth said, “We had evidence that Marilyn Monroe had not only slept with Kennedy, but also with Fidel Castro.

“My commanding officer, Jimmy Hayworth, told me that she had to die, and that it had to look like a suicide or an overdose. I had never killed a woman before, but I obeyed orders. I did it for America. She could have transmitted strategic information to the communists, and we couldn’t allow that! She had to die! I just did what I had to do!”

Hodges said that, while Marilyn was asleep, he snuck into her bedroom and injected the Hollywood actress with a huge dose of the barbiturate, Nembutal, combined with a powerful sedative known as chloral hydrate.

Marilyn Monroe died at home in her bedroom on August 5, 1962 between midnight and 1:00 AM.

Hodges said he and four other CIA operatives carried out political assassinations across the country.

According to Normand, the majority of the victims were union leaders, political activists, and journalists. However, he confessed that some scientists and artists, whose thoughts and actions threatened the interests of the United States, were also on the hit list.

All the four CIA operatives that worked in conjunction with Hodges are either dead or missing.

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Al-Qaida Confirms Death of Senior Leader in Syria due to U.S.-led coalition drone strike

Al-Qaida confirmed that a U.S.-led coalition drone strike had killed senior leader Abu al-Khayr al-Masri,

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** ADV for Scott Lindaw story ** UAV's at the March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County, Calif. on Wednesday June 25, 2008. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Al-Qaida confirmed on Thursday that a U.S.-led coalition drone strike had killed senior leader Abu al-Khayr al-Masri, in a joint statement issued by the militant group’s Maghreb and Arabian Peninsula branches.

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A Hellfire missile fired by a CIA drone killed the al-Qaeda leader late on Sunday while he was riding in a car near the northwestern Syrian city of Idlib, a U.S. intelligence official said on Wednesday.

Al-Masri was second-in-command to the group’s leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, and a member of its shura council, said the official. (VOA)

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Former US CIA Chief Sees Assassination of Kim Jong Nam as Strategic Move

Kim Jong Nam, 45, died February 13 after allegedly being poisoned by two women at Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur International Airport

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FILE - Acting CIA Director John McLaughlin appears before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Aug. 17, 2004, to discuss proposed reorganization of the intelligence community.

The motive for the assassination of the estranged half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un appears to be an attempt to forestall any outside effort to install an alternative to the current leader, a former CIA acting director told VOA this week.

Kim Jong Nam, 45, died February 13 after allegedly being poisoned by two women at Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur International Airport. The women smeared the VX nerve agent on Kim’s face, according to Malaysian police.

VX is a substance listed as a banned chemical weapon under the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention.

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Kuala Lumpur police have arrested the women and one North Korean national, and are seeking seven other North Koreans, including a diplomat based in Kuala Lumpur, for questioning. While the police have not determined if Pyongyang was behind the assassination, Seoul accused the North Korean leader of ordering the killing of his half brother.

FILE - Kim Jong Nam, exiled half brother of North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un, gestures toward his face while talking to airport security and officials at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Malaysia, in this image made Feb. 13, 2017, from Kuala Lumpur airport security cameras.
FILE – Kim Jong Nam, exiled half brother of North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, gestures toward his face while talking to airport security and officials at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Malaysia, in this image made Feb. 13, 2017, from Kuala Lumpur airport security cameras. VOA

In an interview with VOA, John McLaughlin, who served as acting director of Central Intelligence from July to September 2004 and as the deputy director of Central Intelligence from 2000 to 2004 under President George W. Bush, said North Korea is a likely perpetrator in Kim Jong Nam’s death, given the poison used to kill him.

“It’s very hard for someone not connected to a state entity to obtain the kind of poison that was apparently used,” the former CIA official said.

Potential threat to power

Once deemed heir apparent to his late father, Kim Jong Il, who ruled the country from 1994 to 2011, Kim Jong Nam lived in a de facto exile after falling out of favor with him. When asked what might have motivated the regime to order the killing, McLaughlin said: “The North Korean leadership wanted to make sure there is not an alternative readily available for Kim Jong Un.”

“They particularly would want to make sure that China would not have someone handy that they could install in the event Kim Jong Un was removed or fell from power,” said McLaughlin, who is now with the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Although the incident has sparked widespread speculation about the stability of the North Korean regime, McLaughlin cautioned against drawing conclusions. However, he said a series of executions carried out by Kim Jong Un could indicate his power might be insecure.

“The pattern of purging is deep enough to suggest that he is still not totally secure in power,” he said.

Vietnamese suspect Doan Thi Huong (second from right) is escorted by police officers from court in Sepang, Malaysia, March 1, 2017. Two young women accused of smearing VX nerve agent on Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half brother of North Korea's leader, were charged with murder.
Vietnamese suspect Doan Thi Huong (second from right) is escorted by police officers from court in Sepang, Malaysia, March 1, 2017. Two young women accused of smearing VX nerve agent on Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half brother of North Korea’s leader, were charged with murder. VOA

Alarming event

The assassination drew the world’s attention because it took place at one of the busiest airports in Asia, prompting news media to speculate on why such a public venue was chosen.

McLaughlin, a 30-year veteran of the CIA, said the perpetrator might have thought the airport was the place where the victim was “most vulnerable.”

“It was probably seen as a place where what they were doing would be less easily noticed just from the general turmoil of the airport,” he said.

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According to McLaughlin, the incident in Malaysia is an “alarming event” because the banned chemical was used in a public place to kill someone.

“It means that this very unstable regime has a very powerful weapon and was reckless enough to use it in a crowd of people,” he said.

Possible repercussions

China is widely believed to have favored Kim Jong Nam for a leadership position in Pyongyang. The assassination puts Beijing in a difficult position, McLaughlin said.

“I think China faces a bit of dilemma here,” he said. “They don’t want major changes in the [Korean] peninsula, but they also recognize [Kim Jong Un] brings a degree of unpredictability that could shape things in a direction that they would have trouble managing.”

McLaughlin said the United States should relist North Korea as a state of sponsor of terrorism if the communist state is found responsible for the apparent assassination.

The U.S. designated the North as a state of sponsor of terrorism after the country bombed a South Korean airliner in 1987, killing 115 passengers and crew on board. In 2008, the U.S. removed the North from the list as part of a nuclear deal, in which Pyongyang agreed to disable its plutonium plant and allow some inspections.

Following Kim’s death in Kuala Lumpur, some U.S. lawmakers are calling on the Trump administration to repeal the decision.(VOA)

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Pakistan refuses to issue identity Documents to Doctor’s kin who helped hunt Osama Bin Laden

Pakistani authorities have refused to issue identity documents to the family of Shakeel Afridi, a doctor who helped the CIA track down Osama Bin Laden

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In this 1998 file photo made available on March 19, 2004, Osama bin Laden is seen at a news conference in Afghanistan. VOA

Islamabad, Feb 3, 2017:  Pakistani authorities have refused to issue identity documents to the family members of an imprisoned doctor, who helped the CIA to hunt down Osama Bin Laden.

“The authorities have refused to issue identity documents on the pretext that Shakeel Afridi (the doctor) is on the list of people who are not allowed to leave the country,” said the doctor’s counsel, Qamar Nadeem.

The lack of these documents prevents them from voting, travelling and causes problems during enrollment at educational institutions, Efe news reported.

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According to Nadeem, Afridi’s wife and two of his three children, above 18, applied for the documents in December 2016.

He said the two adult children are facing problems in getting enrolled at university due to lack of documents.

A spokesperson of the National Database and Registration Authority, which issues the identity documents, refused to comment on the situation of the doctor’s family.

Zahid Hamid, minister for law and justice, recently said in the Senate that Pakistan will not free the doctor or hand him over to the US.

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The doctor’s case had come into the limelight again when the US President Donald Trump said, during his election campaign, he would get Afridi set free in two minutes if he won the elections.

Afridi took part in a false vaccination campaign in the northeastern Pakistani city of Abbottabad that was orchestrated by the CIA to obtain Bin Laden’s DNA samples and he was arrested shortly after Bin Laden was killed in a special operation by US Special Forces on May 2, 2011.

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A year later, Afridi received a 33-year prison sentence for links to terrorist groups, although it was subsequently reduced to 23 years in 2014. The sentence was severely criticized within and outside the country, and the US has termed it unjust and unnecessary. (IANS)