Tuesday October 24, 2017
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Serve me up some Dosa, Amsterdam!

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Image Source: palmbeachuk.com

Amsterdam, Netherlands: You can get our hands on the delicacy of the masala dosa, all for EUR 7.50, and of course with our essential energy filler, coffee, for another EUR 4.

Wait a second. What is going on? Euros!

Yes, as you or probably don’t know, the thing is that a new Saravanaa Bhavan is up and running in Amsterdam from March 4 and the whole city is abuzz with it.

The talks have been doing rounds in the Dutch capital, about the inauguration of a new Chennai-based vegetarian restaurant, and all of it came to fruition when the first day saw a massive crowd of more than 350 people.

And oh! The place was designed to accommodate a population of 110 people only.

CEO and managing director, P R Shiva Kumar told about the customers being from the cosmopolitan sector; with 65 percent being Indians and Indian expats, and 35 percent of the rest being the Dutch.

He talked about their staff, all of whom are well equipped and experienced and how it took them about 7 months to acquire a work permit for them.

“All the chefs working in our outlets outside India are trained in the kitchens of the parent company in several capacities. We want to maintain the same taste and quality in each of the outlets” he added.

One also came to know about the background of their waiters. Mr Kumar mentions that it is relatively easier to employ the Indians in London and Paris, as most of them are either students or locally settled in. Whereas, the picture of Netherlands is totally different, with the Indian population being involved mainly in high-skilled tasks of IT and banking.

He did not forget to tell about how they did not really had to advertise their Franchise, since people themselves poured in with much awe of glutton-free food especially those from the Indian diaspora, as the place has a glass façade on both the sides which obviously wowed the mass.

The ingredients are supplied from Paris, as the chain has a quality supplier of the Indian groceries, unlike anywhere in the Netherlands.

The coffee powder, on the other side, is a mix of Arabic and that of peaberry exported from the other parts of Europe, which really sets the bar high.

So, this summer one does not have to worry about bankrupting themselves by spending as much as that of EUR 150 in Paris for only a night as there is the option of heading straight for the Netherlands. (Inputs from The Hindu)

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“Regionality is What Sets Indian Food Apart” from the Cuisines Across the World, says MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan

Gary Mehigan carries back inspiration from India to his kitchen from his each visit

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MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan
MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan. Twitter
  • Gary Mehigan said that Indian food is gaining deserved attention globally
  • We have many Indian chefs like Manish Mehrotra, Sanjeev Kapoor
  • The Chef expressed that food the world over has seen enormous changes driven by social media

August 27, 2017: Globally renowned English-Australian chef, television show host and restaurateur Gary Mehigan says he believes that “regionality is what sets Indian food apart” from the cuisines across the world.

In an email interview with IANS from Melbourne, Mehigan said that Indian food is gaining deserved attention globally. “We’re close to seeing India explore its intellectual property, namely food, properly. We have many Indian chefs like Manish Mehrotra, Sanjeev Kapoor and many other names from all over the world infiltrating the food scene in a big way.”

 “People still sometimes see Indian food as a homogeneous chicken tikka, rogan josh, chicken vindaloo cuisine, when we know it is far from the truth. Regionality is what sets Indian food apart. Regionality is what the world is going to appreciate when it starts to learn about Indian food,” Mehigan explained.

“I hope I’m a part of those who bring great Indian food to Australia,” said the chef, who is now the face of Fox Life’s “Food @ 9: India Special with Gary Mehigan”.

“There’s quite a bit of Australian talent we’re trying to showcase through the series. These shows get addictive and help us travel vicariously through our television sets,” he stated.

ALSO READ: Indulge in Gluttony: 14 Surprising Facts that you never knew about Indian Food!

Mehigan, who will be setting foot in India for the seventh time this November, said he carries back inspiration from the country to his kitchen from each visit.

“I love the country – something about the color, the chaos, the diversity and the originality of the food, it all gets under your skin. I carry home a few recipes and ideas each time I visit. It’s certainly changed the way I cook at home,” he said.

Known popularly for shows like “Far Flung with Gary Mehigan”, and for his presence as a judge on “MasterChef Australia”, the Chef expressed that food the world over has seen enormous changes driven by social media.

“I’m loving where food is at the moment. Ideas are being shared so quickly through social media — whether it’s Instagram, Twitter or Facebook. I can browse through my Instagram and look at what some of my most favorite restaurants in the world are serving for lunch.

“The frame of reference for younger cooks is much bigger. They are able to browse through how a matcha ice-cream is made in Tokyo, or how funky desserts are made in Parisian cafes,” Mehigan said.

All in all, it’s a great thing for food with awareness growing, he opined. “This global club of foodies is only expanding. It’s a great thing for food, our health, and our planet too if we care about where our food comes from.”

Social media is also one of his ways to keep reinventing his food, said the chef, who has been in the industry for nearly three decades.

“Social media is there to keep my imagination going. I’m food obsessed. I go on holidays because of food. I think I’ve never been in love with food more than I am now,” Mehigan said, signing off. (IANS)

 

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World Food India 2017: Netherlands to Participate as the ‘Focus Country’

To promote the grand event, Harsimrat Kaur Badal was in the Netherlands

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world food india
World Food India 2017. Facebook
  • The World Food India 2017 is to be organized in Delhi from the 3rd to 5th November
  • Netherlands has recently announced itself participating as the ‘focus country.’ 
  • India and Netherland have good bilateral ties, and this is another significant step forward

August 26, 2017: The World Food India 2017 will be organized from 3rd to 5th November in New Delhi. On Wednesday, Netherlands declared that it wishes to participate as a ‘focus country.’

Martijn van Dam, Netherlands’ Minister of Agriculture, expressed the decision of Netherlands to be the ‘Focus Country’ at the 2017 World Food India to the Minister of Food Processing Harsimran Kaur Badal.

Also Read: Dorset Indian Mela: Indian food festival on August 26 in the UK to Showcase different varieties of Cuisine and Culture

A business, as well as official delegation, will be sent by Netherlands for the event organized in the capital of India.

To promote the grand event, Harsimrat Kaur Badal was in the Hague, Netherlands.

The objective of the World Food India 2017 is to explain the policy environment of India to the global food industry. It further seeks to establish India as a major player in the global industry and provide investment platforms.

Netherlands, being the ‘focus country’ at the event, will get to showcase its expertise and knowledge about the food processing sector. This will include seminars through the country.

Harsimrat Kau badal speaking to ANI, stated, “World Food India welcomes The Netherlands as Focus Country and hopes that participation from The Netherlands will help businesses from both sides to leverage each other’s strengths for mutual benefit.” She also highlighted that good bilateral relationship exists between India and Netherlands and this is another step forward.

Netherlands has invested close to US $6 billion into India in the last couple of years. India is also doing good business with over 200 companies from Netherlands. However, there is still so much more potential of development.


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Indian Cuisine touted as the ‘Big Trend’ of 2017: Spicing Up San Francisco with Indian Cuisine

Whether you're craving for home-style recipes or inventive modern twists, San Francisco's Indian restaurants have lots to offer.

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Indian dishes and their unique spices
Indian spices and flavors. Wikimedia
  • Indian cuisine is touted as the ‘big trend’ of 2017
  • Authentic Indian flavors with contemporary cooking styles and presentation are hitting all the right spots with the West

San Francisco, August 15, 2017: Exotic cocktails made with Indian spices and elixirs. And dishes that have such diverse, unique and bold flavors that the staff actually has to guide diners, particularly in situations where many might not be familiar with the authentic dishes made and served with a contemporary style. A modern dining experience overlooked by industry veterans from India. And an ambitious menu in equally ambitious restaurants- Indian dining chains are currently having a wild moment in San Francisco.

Indian food accounts for less than two percent of the ethnic food market in the United States, but it still has the fastest growing rate. Courtesy, its aromatic, flavorful and un-parallel combination of food.

Indian cuisine, which remained largely ignored for decades is now being touted as the ‘next-big-thing’ with studies pointing that Indian food is potentially going to be one of the biggest trends throughout 2017.

An increasing number of Americans on Quora have shared that quality Indian food requires fine culinary skills, which makes it an expensive affair for an average American. But despite this, Indian food remains an unshakable indulgence and has finally engaged mainstream tastes.

People of non-Indian backgrounds are popularly indulging in Indian food.
Indian food is hitting all the right spots with the Western palates. Quora

In an article published in 2012 for Wall Street Journal, “Is Indian Cuisine Coming of Age in America?” the author Visi R. Tilak explored the reason why Indian food was becoming increasingly popular in the West. According to him, it was because of the expanding American palate, which was only becoming bolder.

Indian food’s fast growing popularity can be attributed to the cuisine’s unique flavors that are hard to replicate. After all, there are not many other cultures that use the same combination of herbs and spices that can be found in a typical Indian dish.

And at the hub of this entire extravaganza is the city of San Francisco!

From upscale joints, to major food chains and small cafes- they are all dwelling in authentic Indian dishes, but with a contemporary twist!

ALSO READ Indulge in Gluttony: 14 Surprising Facts that you never knew about Indian Food!

Whether you’re craving for home-style recipes or inventive modern twists, San Francisco’s Indian restaurants have lots to offer. With veterans from the industry in India overlooking everything that goes out, their chefs have trained in the North and South and all other parts of India, at Michelin-starred restaurants, at tiny local cafes and big industry names and of course, their grandmother’s kitchens.

Irrespective of the style you prefer, Indian food is having a bit of a renaissance in San Francisco.

“We deep dived into Bengali recipes recently that my grandmother had passed down via my mother. This to me is far more interesting than fine-dining meals over multiple courses”, said Anjan Mitra of Dosa.

Regional Indian cuisines comprise an early trend that is yet to establish deep ground, which is why ventures like Dosa attract an ever-expanding crowd. And the fact that South Indian cuisine remained largely unexplored till a few years back works well to their advantage!

Anjan believes the underlying strength of Indian food is to expose foreign cultures to the wonderful diversity of the Indian culinary landscape.

Dosa has established a niche by serving Indian food made with high quality ingredients. With dishes like Quinoa Uthappam and paler cauliflower rice, their impressive menu caters to gluten-free, nut-free and other dietary requirements. Anjan believes in the simple philosophy that delicious and healthy food finds an audience.

Dosa ia a South Indian restaurant venture by Anjan Mitra
Dosa has established a niche space among the SF city diners. Quora

Of late, Anjan Mitra and his team have planned a trip for 20 San Franciscans to dwell in the regional Indian cuisine. Calling it The Great South India Food Journey, the 10 day trip will commence from November 25 and will cover Mumbai, Kochi, Periyar and Kumarakom. “There are plans to get the traveler exposed to local restaurants, but also to home cooking. Liam Mayclem (the Emmy Award winning radio and TV star) who I have known via the food scene in SF for many years will join us,” he said, as reported by the Hindu.

With popular names like Aslam’s Rasoi, Roti Indian Bistro, Babu Ji and Udupi Palace among many others, the city offers a multitude of graciously-spiced, slow simmered deliciousness spanning across the extreme corners of the city of hills.

Chef Sujan Sarkar, of Rooh, continues to charm the vibrant palate of San Franciscans with his progressive style of Indian cuisine, using a wide variety of local produce to his advantage. Upon being asked what’s next, he added “Possible rabbit. And I want to use Bamboo rice which is healthy, with no starch. Black garlic is trending. I enjoy using it and activated charcoal in my experiments.”

The chef, familiar to many for his leading role in Delhi’s Olive Bar and Kitchen, offers a new interpretation of Indian Cuisine using ingredients one would not imagine, like ramps that are smaller in size than scallions and have a mild onion flavor.

Chef Sujan has previously worked magic in London (where Madonna dined thrice at his former restaurant, Almada), India and now San Francisco, is trained in modern European and French cuisine, the techniques for which hold strong in his culinary expression. His dishes “enjoy fresh ingredients and creativity on the plate. Rooh celebrates the innovative spirit of modern India”, he told the Hindu.

 


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.
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