Monday December 11, 2017

Shaucham: The cleanliness of the body and the mind

0
515

By Nithin Sridhar

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 6

Photo credit: kidspiritonline.com
Photo credit: kidspiritonline.com

Among the many tenets of dharma (duty and righteousness) that Hindu scriptures have prescribed for the welfare of humanity, there is one tenet that is of extreme practical relevance in day to day life. It is the tenet of “Shaucha” or cleanliness. The Daksha Smriti gives a lucid description of Shaucha. In verse (5.2), it says that people must strive hard to maintain cleanliness in all their actions. It further says all those actions which have been performed without adhering to the tenets of cleanliness become fruitless. In verse (5.3), it describes in depth about how to practice Shaucha in daily life. It says:

shauchancha dvividham proktam bahyamabhyantarantatha |
mrujjalabhyam smrutam bahyam bhavashuddhistathantaram ||
Translation: The cleanliness is said to be of two types- external and internal. The external is the use of clay and water and the internal is the purification of mind.

Therefore, as far as practice is concerned, Shaucham is of two kinds- external cleanliness that includes the cleanliness of the body, objects and the surroundings and the internal cleanliness that involves the purification of the mind.

Most people keep their house clean and neat. But this attitude is not extended to the external surroundings. People throw garbage on the empty plot beside their homes and they spit and piss at the side of the roads. Many throw plastics and other garbage on the roads even when the dustbins are available.

These are clear actions of “ashaucha” or “non-cleanliness”. It is true that proper toilet facilities are not available everywhere and hence many people prefer to go out in the open. But this attitude has become so ingrained in some people that they do not use toilets even when they are available. This is a clear act of adharma (non-righteousness).

But, this cleanliness is not limited to keeping the house and surroundings clean. It also applies to various human actions like causing environmental pollution. Human beings have made the air, water, the earth and even the space dirty and polluted by their actions.

As the Daksha Smriti said, any action which is done without a care for cleanliness becomes fruitless, we are witnessing this happening in front of us. The ever-increasing environmental pollution and global warming are harming the humans themselves. They have given rise to so many diseases which were unheard of before industrial revolution.

It is practically impossible in this age to be 100 percent clean even externally because our actions directly or indirectly do contribute to various kinds of pollutions. But, what is definitely possible is to develop awareness about the importance of cleanliness and to implement it in day to day life to the best of our abilities.

Small actions like throwing garbage only into the dustbins, not spitting and pissing in the open unless it is absolutely necessary and there is no alternative available, trying to avoid those actions that may cause, water, noise or air pollutions etc. can go a long way in helping the society. These actions are termed as “Bahya Shaucha” or “external cleanliness.”

More important, but more difficult than external cleanliness is the practice of “Antar Shaucha” or “Internal Cleanliness.” Human actions are guided by their attitudes and thoughts. In every situation, a person decides to act in a particular way based on his rational thoughts, emotional feelings, attitude, and his decision-making abilities.

But all these are various functions of the mind alone. The mind is inflicted with internal passions called as “Arishadvarga.” Hindu scriptures classify them into six divisions: kaama (lust), krodha (anger), moha (delusion), mada (pride), matsarya (jealousy), and loba (greed).

Our emotional or the rational responses, our spontaneous reflexes or the planned responses, they are all under the effect of these six passions. All our actions, words and thoughts are controlled by these passions. Therefore, to attain the internal purity, one must become free from these passions. A person who can thus attain internal purity is called as “Stitah-prajna”- a person of firm consciousness, a person whose mind is unaffected by external or internal factors.

Hindu scriptures advice various methods to attain this internal purity. One method is through self-introspection. One should always be extremely alert regarding one’s thoughts, speech, and action. One must analyze every situation and perform only dharmic actions. The life of Lord Rama highlights this approach. He is called “Dharma-murti” (the symbol of dharma) for this reason.

Another approach is the path of selfless actions. One must practice one’s actions with a sense of duty and detachment towards the fruits of actions. One must be aware of one’s svadharma (individual duties) and sincerely perform them by giving up attachments to the fruits of those actions. The next step in this path is to surrender the fruits of actions, the doership of actions and the actions themselves at the feet of God.

It is not that these are exclusive paths; one often leads to the other. The gist is, by performance of such detached and selfless dharmic actions, a person will eventually become free from lust, anger etc. In fact, this internal purity also called as “chitta-shuddhi” is the very basic requirement without which one is not eligible to practice Vedanta.

Therefore, Shaucha is a very important tenet of dharma not only for the material and spiritual welfare of an individual but also for the social, ecological, and universal welfare.

More in this segment:

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 1

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 2

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 3

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 4

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 5

Next Story

Having a Tough Time Parenting? Know These Instances When You Need to Say No to Your Kids

0
46
Say no to your Kids
Say no to your kids when necessary. Pixabay.
  • Being a parent is not an easy task which comes along with a lot of responsibilities and commitments.
  • To add more, the toughest part of the job seems to be when you have a say no to your kids.
  • Although, sometimes you can be an engaging parent to your child into fun activities but ensure to say no to your kids in matters that concern health and morale of your kiddo.

The following are a few instances where you need to say no to your kids irrespective of their wishes and demands:

Going to bed and waking up on time

Say no to your kids
Say no to your kids for playing in the night and not sleeping. Pixabay.

You should be strict about deadlines for sleeping and form a proper routine for your kid—be it on school nights or holidays. You should convince yourself to say no to your kids and convey the importance of sleep with bedtime stories or healthy conversations. Afterall, we all know ‘Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise’.

Skipping meals

Ensure that your child consumes food at regular intervals. You should coax your child gently if your child denies eating certain meals. Say no to your kids to skip the morning breakfast. It forms the most important meal of the day that fills the body with required nutrition.

Overall hygiene

Say no your kids
Stress the importance of washing hands. Pixabay.

Healthy habits concerning hygiene and cleanliness should be inculcated to your child. Stress the importance of washing hands before and after meals and after using the toilets. Also, promote healthy eating by including nutrient-rich vegetables and fruits in your kid’s diet plan and say no to your kids to eat junk food.

Fewer video games, more exercise

Say no to your kids
Exercising should be given importance to kids. Pixabay.

Make a specific time for your child to use electronic devices or play video games. At the same time, encourage them to play outdoor games and take part in physical activity. Exercising will help in boosting immunity to fight infections. Say no to your kids over excessive playing with electronic devices.

No gadgets at mealtimes

Say no to your kids
Say no to your kids for junk food, instead add healthy snacks. Pixabay.

Healthy habits would make your child more active and happy. Say no to kids when it comes to watching television or the computer that will make your child lethargic. Introduce strict rules of not using gadgets at mealtimes.

-Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana

Next Story

Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here

1
121
hindus
Hinduism. Pixabay

Oct 06, 2017: Have you ever wondered what being a Hindu means? Or who is actually fit to be called a Hindu? Over centuries, Hindus and Indians alike have asked this question to themselves or their elders at least once in their lifetime.

In the 1995 ruling of the case, “Bramchari Sidheswar Shai and others Versus State of West Bengal” the court identified seven defining characteristics of Hinduism but people are still confused to what exactly defines being a Hindu in the 21st century. It’s staggering how uninformed individuals can be about their own religion; according to a speech by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya there are various common notions we carry about who a Hindu is:

  • Anyone born in India is automatically a Hindu
  • If your parents are Hindu, you’re are also inevitably a Hindu
  • If you believe in reincarnation, you’re a Hindu
  • If you follow any religion practiced in India, you’re a Hindu
  • And lastly, if you are born in a certain caste, you’re a Hindu

After answering these statements some fail to remove their doubts on who a Hindu is. The question arises when someone is unsure on how to portray themselves in the society, many people follow a set of notions which might/might not be the essence of Hinduism and upon asked why they perform a particular ritual they are clueless. The problem is that the teachings are passed on for generations and the source has been long forgotten, for the source is exactly where the answer lies.

Religion corresponds to scriptural texts

The world is home to many religions and each religion has its own uniqueness portrayed out of the scriptures and teachings which are universally accepted. So to simplify the dilemma one can say that determining whether someone belongs to a particular religion is directly related to whether he/she follows the religious scriptures of the particular religion, and also whether they abide to live by the authority of the scriptural texts.

Christianity emerges from the guidance of the Gospels and Islam from the Quran where Christians believe Jesus died for their sins and Muslims believe there is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet. Similarly, Hinduism emerges from a set of scriptures known as the Vedas and a Hindu is one who lives according to Dharma which is implicated in the divine laws in the Vedic scriptures.By default, the person who follows these set of religious texts is a Hindu.

Also Read: Christianity and Islam don’t have room for a discourse. Hindus must Stop Pleasing their former Christian or Muslim masters, says Maria Wirth 

Vedas distinguishes Hindu from a Non-Hindu

Keeping this definition in mind, all the Hindu thinkers of the traditional schools of Hindu philosophy accept and also insist on accepting the Vedas as a scriptural authority for distinguishing Hindus from Non-Hindus. Further implying the acceptance of the following of Bhagwat Gita, Ramayana, Puranas etc as a determining factor by extension principle as well.

Bottom Line

So, concluding the debate on who is a Hindu we can say that a person who believes in the authority of the Vedas and lives by the Dharmic principles of the Vedas is a Hindu. Also implying that anyone regardless of their nationality i.e. American, French or even Indian can be called a Hindu if they accept the Vedas.

– Prepared by Tanya Kathuria of Newsgram                                                                

(the article was originally written by Shubhamoy Das and published by thoughtco)

One response to “Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here”

  1. Hindu is a historical name for people living “behind the river Indus”. So, everyone living in India is a Hindu, eventhough he might have a different faith.

Next Story

5 traits of lord Rama which make him the Supreme Being

One of the main deities in Hinduism, He is believed to have lived in the Treta Yuga, 1.2 million years ago

0
52
Hindu God Rama
The best qualities of lord Rama. Maa Durga wallpaper

New Delhi, September 22, 2017: Lord Rama, the seventh avatar of lord Vishnu, is the central character of Hindu epic Ramayana and is considered as the most important avatar of the deity. Rama is considered to be an enlightened man, with great regard for morals and values. He has also been given the title of Maryada Purushottama, which means the perfect man. One of the main deities in Hinduism, He is believed to have lived in the Treta Yuga, 1.2 million years ago. He has even been defined as, “the embodiment of truth, of morality, the ideal son, the ideal husband, and above all, the ideal king,” by Swami Vivekananda. For the perfection that he personifies, let’s take a look at the best of his qualities.

Traits of Lord Rama: 

1. Satisfaction: He was satisfied with whatever he had, even a little less couldn’t have bothered him.

Best qualities of lord Rama
Satisfaction.

2. Loyalty: He never thought of a woman other than Sita in his entire life.

Lord Rama
Loyalty.

Also read: Ramayana : 6 Timeless Management Lessons From the Ancient Hindu Text that You Must Imbibe

3. Kindness: He was a kind soul, who wished well for every creature on earth.

Hindu God Rama
Kindness.

4. Spirituality: The title of a king did not stop him from performing his spiritual practices.

Hindu God Rama
Spirituality.

5. Humility: He never talked about his goodness or greatness.

Hindu God Rama
Humility.
                              -prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. twitter @goel_samiksha
                                                                                                          

 

pic credit – maa durga wallpaper