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State Government asks Dalit Christian and Muslim Farmers to quit Temple Lands in Andhra Pradesh

Under the new order by AP Government, Muslim and Christian farm tenants are forbidden to work the lands of Hindu temples

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Land in Andhra Pradesh (Representational Image). Image source: www.propveda.com
  • The government only wants Hindus to cultivate temple lands
  • The order was issued in November 2015 but has now been put into action, as leases on lands need to be renewed
  • Dalits were asked for proof from Church that they are not practicing Christianity

There was an order issued in November of 2015 stating that the Andhra Pradesh government forbid Dalit Christians and Muslims from cultivating Hindu temple lands. This order is now being put into action as it is the beginning of the agricultural season when land leases get renewed. The Andhra government began taking action earlier this month. They issued notices to tenant farmers saying they needed to hand over the land immediately.

Temples in Andhra Pradesh (Representational Image). Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Temples in Andhra Pradesh (Representational Image). Image source: Wikimedia Commons

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Dalit tenants (those from the lowest caste system) were asked to provide paperwork from the church. This paperwork was needed as proof to show that they are not practicing Christianity. In recent times, many members of this lowest caste system have converted to Christianity. Since many of the Dalits have not changed their names, it is hard to tell who is practicing Christianity and who is not.

A senior endowments commissioner stated, “We’ve issued notices to Dalit farmers to obtain certificates from the church in accordance with the GO.” This worries some of the Dalits. They fear if they do not receive the correct paperwork from the church in time, they will lose the lease on the land, said the TOI report.

Muslims, on the other hand, were completely banned from cultivating the temple lands under the new rules.

The continuation of current land leases directly correlated with the new kharif season. Since the rules and guidelines have been changed, things will change with this kharif season. The order clearly states, “No person professing a religion other than Hinduism is entitled to obtain lease either through tender-cum-public auction or otherwise.”

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According to the TOI report, There have been different responses to this new order. Habib-ur-Rehman, a Muslim United Front member claims the order is weird, “For that matter, 80 per cent of tenants of Jumma Masjid in Guntur are non-Muslims.” Traditionally the temples in Andhra are cultivated by tenant farmers. They control nearly 3 lakh acres of the farmland; 30 percent of them are Dalits.

One example of this is the Sri Raghu Rama temple in Gollapalli in the Krishna district. There are over 1,200 acres owned by this temple, with 1,568 farmers tending to the land. Of these farmers, 199 are Muslims, 204 are SCs and five are tribals. All of these farmers have been notified by Temple authority of the changes in law.

Similarly, the tenant farmers who work the 300 acres of land of the Sri Venugopala Swamy temple are Muslims. In this case though, police authorities were brought along to help the field officers move the tenants off the land if they failed to produce the correct paperwork.

-This report is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here

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hindus
Hinduism. Pixabay

Oct 06, 2017: Have you ever wondered what being a Hindu means? Or who is actually fit to be called a Hindu? Over centuries, Hindus and Indians alike have asked this question to themselves or their elders at least once in their lifetime.

In the 1995 ruling of the case, “Bramchari Sidheswar Shai and others Versus State of West Bengal” the court identified seven defining characteristics of Hinduism but people are still confused to what exactly defines being a Hindu in the 21st century. It’s staggering how uninformed individuals can be about their own religion; according to a speech by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya there are various common notions we carry about who a Hindu is:

  • Anyone born in India is automatically a Hindu
  • If your parents are Hindu, you’re are also inevitably a Hindu
  • If you believe in reincarnation, you’re a Hindu
  • If you follow any religion practiced in India, you’re a Hindu
  • And lastly, if you are born in a certain caste, you’re a Hindu

After answering these statements some fail to remove their doubts on who a Hindu is. The question arises when someone is unsure on how to portray themselves in the society, many people follow a set of notions which might/might not be the essence of Hinduism and upon asked why they perform a particular ritual they are clueless. The problem is that the teachings are passed on for generations and the source has been long forgotten, for the source is exactly where the answer lies.

Religion corresponds to scriptural texts

The world is home to many religions and each religion has its own uniqueness portrayed out of the scriptures and teachings which are universally accepted. So to simplify the dilemma one can say that determining whether someone belongs to a particular religion is directly related to whether he/she follows the religious scriptures of the particular religion, and also whether they abide to live by the authority of the scriptural texts.

Christianity emerges from the guidance of the Gospels and Islam from the Quran where Christians believe Jesus died for their sins and Muslims believe there is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet. Similarly, Hinduism emerges from a set of scriptures known as the Vedas and a Hindu is one who lives according to Dharma which is implicated in the divine laws in the Vedic scriptures.By default, the person who follows these set of religious texts is a Hindu.

Also Read: Christianity and Islam don’t have room for a discourse. Hindus must Stop Pleasing their former Christian or Muslim masters, says Maria Wirth 

Vedas distinguishes Hindu from a Non-Hindu

Keeping this definition in mind, all the Hindu thinkers of the traditional schools of Hindu philosophy accept and also insist on accepting the Vedas as a scriptural authority for distinguishing Hindus from Non-Hindus. Further implying the acceptance of the following of Bhagwat Gita, Ramayana, Puranas etc as a determining factor by extension principle as well.

Bottom Line

So, concluding the debate on who is a Hindu we can say that a person who believes in the authority of the Vedas and lives by the Dharmic principles of the Vedas is a Hindu. Also implying that anyone regardless of their nationality i.e. American, French or even Indian can be called a Hindu if they accept the Vedas.

– Prepared by Tanya Kathuria of Newsgram                                                                

(the article was originally written by Shubhamoy Das and published by thoughtco)

One response to “Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here”

  1. Hindu is a historical name for people living “behind the river Indus”. So, everyone living in India is a Hindu, eventhough he might have a different faith.

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Rituals Exist in All Cultures and they are Important

Rituals play a prominent role in every culture

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Religion
Ancient Indian Religion.

Hinduism is a practice, which is known for its rich rituals. From the Vedic ages, Hindus perform certain activities right from the time they wake up in the morning until the time they sleep. These activities may include, Pooja (worshipping lord) and Karya (Working), which integrate their culture. The events manifest a certain beauty, without which Hinduism is incomplete.

Different sects of Hindus worship different deities. Various Poojas are held for different festivities and occasions called the ‘Utsavas’. People during different festivals not just gather to worship the god, but also come together to celebrate life, with beautiful colours, clothes and delicious food. This itself proves that rituals manifest the beauty and celebration of life in Hinduism.

Meaning Of Rituals:

However, certain sections of the society have a preconceived notion about the rituals Hindus perform, which leads to them being called ‘superstitious’ or ‘overtly religious’. But is it fair to tag them? What is the meaning of the ritual? Ritual can be any activity which you perform. It is a way of communication. A teacher teaching his or her students can be a ritual. A mother feeding her baby is a ritual. Ritual is a generic term, which must not be linked with traditions, religion and beliefs? And, even if it is associated with these customs, then Hinduism should not be the only target. Every religion follows some beliefs. For example, a Muslim reading Namaz is a ritual; Christians visiting church on every Sunday is a ritual or Thanksgivings, when people have dinners with their friends and families. Hindus may have more rituals to act on than Muslims or Christians, but this gives no one the right to invalidate their belief. The rituals which Hindus perform don’t just have a connection with God, but also scientific reasons behind them. For example, Surya Namaskar is good for health as facing the light at that time of the day is good for your eyes, and makes you a morning person.

Also Read: Navratri 5th Day, The Tales That Speaks About Mother-Son Relationship

The reason why people not like rituals is due to their stifling and obligatory nature. Since our childhood, we have been asked to adhere to certain activities, and never taught the reason behind them. This develops disconnection towards them.

Benefits Of Rituals:

Rituals should be seen as art. We must not do it for the sake of doing it. We must sense its meaning like we sense the meaning of art. There is a side of these customs which we don’t want as well, but at the end of the day, they generate a sense of unity and belongingness. They bind you as a community. As long as we live as humans, these practices will have an integral role to play in our life, which can not be neglected.

by Megha Acharya of NewsGram.      Megha can be reached at Twitter @ImMeghaacharya.

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5 traits of lord Rama which make him the Supreme Being

One of the main deities in Hinduism, He is believed to have lived in the Treta Yuga, 1.2 million years ago

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Hindu God Rama
The best qualities of lord Rama. Maa Durga wallpaper

New Delhi, September 22, 2017: Lord Rama, the seventh avatar of lord Vishnu, is the central character of Hindu epic Ramayana and is considered as the most important avatar of the deity. Rama is considered to be an enlightened man, with great regard for morals and values. He has also been given the title of Maryada Purushottama, which means the perfect man. One of the main deities in Hinduism, He is believed to have lived in the Treta Yuga, 1.2 million years ago. He has even been defined as, “the embodiment of truth, of morality, the ideal son, the ideal husband, and above all, the ideal king,” by Swami Vivekananda. For the perfection that he personifies, let’s take a look at the best of his qualities.

Traits of Lord Rama: 

1. Satisfaction: He was satisfied with whatever he had, even a little less couldn’t have bothered him.

Best qualities of lord Rama
Satisfaction.

2. Loyalty: He never thought of a woman other than Sita in his entire life.

Lord Rama
Loyalty.

Also read: Ramayana : 6 Timeless Management Lessons From the Ancient Hindu Text that You Must Imbibe

3. Kindness: He was a kind soul, who wished well for every creature on earth.

Hindu God Rama
Kindness.

4. Spirituality: The title of a king did not stop him from performing his spiritual practices.

Hindu God Rama
Spirituality.

5. Humility: He never talked about his goodness or greatness.

Hindu God Rama
Humility.

                              -prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. twitter @goel_samiksha
                                                                                                          

 

pic credit – maa durga wallpaper