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Temples are amalgamation of Science and Faith: Find out why!

Science behind every part of a Hindu Temple, explained.

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Prambanan. Image source: www.touropia.com
  • Temples have amazing science behind their structure and conception
  • The purpose of visiting a temple is to take all the positive energy that gets transferred from the Earth’s surface to the human body through various mediums
  • The copper plate placed beneath the idol absorbs the magnetic waves and radiates it to the surroundings

Temples, Shrines, Holy places – places of worship have been known by many names but they all tender to one feeling- Faith. Since time immemorial, men have been arguing about whether the devotion towards the heaven above is futile or whether it holds some meaning. It’s a never-ending debate between belief and logic.

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This debate is best fought in India, a country known for budding science enthusiasts and age-old priests/sages, all thriving on the same piece of land. A country with many faiths each with its own unique face in the form of a shrine. A country with endless structures of age-old stone art stretched over the landscape, wherever your eyes can see. Having said that, India is also a country that gave birth to many self-proclaimed atheists in the field of science and technology (Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, an astrophysicist) and in the field of films (John Abraham, a movie star).

But what if we told you that temples, structures that symbolize faith or religion, have amazing science behind their structure and conception. Here are 6 reasons proving how faith and science can go hand in hand in the Hindu temples.

 Structure

Temples in Andhra Pradesh (Representational Image). Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Temples in Andhra Pradesh (Representational Image). Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Take into consideration the distribution of magnetic energy from the north and south poles and you’ll realize that temples are strategically built at the core of this positive energy from these poles.
‘Garbhagriha’-A name given to the center of a temple is an area where the idol is placed. It is also the place where earth natural magnetic waves are found to be at their peak. Account these small nuances when it comes to the structure of the temple and many questions can be answered.

 Strategic placement of the idol

Ganesha. Image source: grandmumbaitours.blogspot.com
Ganesha. Image source: grandmumbaitours.blogspot.com

Ever wondered why your body feels a whole wave of positive energy when you stand near the idol? It’s the copper plate placed beneath the idol that absorbs the magnetic waves and radiates it to the surroundings.

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An idol is a representation of the God above. It’s a physical image that helps you visualize the divine and hence concentrate. Worshipping the idol helps the devotee move on to the next step and that’s mental prayers. All together this process helps a person concentrate and hence strengthen his mind.

Parikrama

Nandi. Image source: shilpavenkat.wordpress.com
Nandi. Image source: shilpavenkat.wordpress.com

The priest tells you to take three rounds of the idol after your mental prayers. This act is known as parikrama. An idol that’s charged with positive energy radiates its energy to anything in its vicinity. Therefore your three rounds rejuvenate our mind body and soul as it charges you up with positive energies.

Temple bells

Temple Bell. Image Source: Wikimedia Common
Temple Bell. Image Source: Wikimedia Common

A temple bell is not made of some ordinary metal; it’s an amalgamation of cadmium, zinc, lead, copper, nickel, chromium and manganese. The ratio in which they are combined leads it to produce a distinct sound for about seven seconds this unites the left and ride side of your brain such that the echo of the sound touches your bodies seven healing chakras. It sends your brain in a stage of the trace for microseconds and it becomes extremely receptive and aware.

Blowing The Conch

Hindu priests blow conch shells as Indian Hindu widows play Holi at the Gopinath temple, 180 kilometres (112 miles) south-east of New Delhi, India, on Monday, March 21, 2016. Image source: AP
Hindu priests blow conch shells. Image source: AP

In Hinduism blowing the Conch is associated with the sacred syllable and sound ‘Om’. This, in turn, is believed to be the sound that which brings in a new hope. With the positive energy already radiating in the temples, the sound has a more powerful impact.

Transfer of energy

Shiv Linga. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Shiv Linga. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

The purpose of visiting a temple isn’t to offer valuables to the deity; it’s to take all the positive energy that gets transferred from the Earths surface to the human body through various mediums. This rejuvenates your senses and hence compels you to spend some tine after offering prayers to make your visit rewarding.

  • by Karishma Vanjani of Newsgram. Twitter Handle: @BladesnBoots

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BBC Plans to Showcase Documentaries on Hinduism, will Explore Faith and Ethical Issues

BBC will project Hinduism in these films accurately and which will be based on the ancient Hinduism scriptures and not reimagine Hinduism concepts and traditions to fit its programs

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Hinduism
Incense stick in Hinduism. Pixabay

August 08, 2017: A new documentary strand of five films a year will be showcased on BBC One will explore faith and ethical issues in all the major religions in exciting and contemporary new ways, including Hinduism.

Hindus called the step in the positive direction and welcomed BBC for the idea of producing films on Hinduism.

BBC will project Hinduism in these films accurately and it will be based on the ancient Hinduism scriptures and not reimagine Hinduism concepts and traditions to fit its programs.

As per the 2016 report in The Sunday Times, “The BBC is too Christian in its religious output, according to an internal review, and should increase its Muslim, Hindu, and Sikh programming”.

Hinduism, the third largest religion in the world has about 1.1 billion adherents and moksha… Click To Tweet

As per the sources, Hinduism was highly underserved at BBC. Multiculturalism had been growing fast in the UK  because of which it was now a diverse society formed of various religions and denominations and non-believers, however, BBC had not kept pace with it.

It was time for the superfluous religious production at BBC to end, giving way to uniformly distributed time among various religions/denominations/non-believers.

Adequate coverage of Diwali, Holi, Krishna Janmashtami, Maha Shivaratri, Ram Navami, Ganesha Chaturthi, Navaratri, Duserra, Hanuman Jayanti, Makar Sankranti, Yugadi and other Hindu festivals, must also be covered by BBC.

Hymns from ancient Sanskrit scriptures, contemporary bhajans, and Hindu lessons should constantly form part of BBC One’s 54 years old “Songs of Praise”, one of the world’s longest-running religious television series.

Hindu hymns, songs, and faith stories were highly stimulating, warm and engaging. Moreover, God liked all songs-of-praise, notwithstanding the religion these came from.

ALSO READ: More Than Just a Sign: Decoding Hinduism With These 5 Major Symbols 

The intervention of The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is a must in this multi-faith issue. Its priorities included people, communities, and nations learning to live together with diversity in a spirit of love and respect.

\BBC, whose ‘values’ included “celebrate our diversity” and “great things happen when we work together” and whose ‘purposes’ included “reflect, represent and serve the diverse communities”, should show some development on this issue.

BBC should take religion more seriously, and help us build interconnections and create harmony Click To Tweet

BBC labeled “yoga” as “fad” in 2013 and Hindu festival of Holi as “filthy festival” in 2012 to which it apologized later. BBC has been accused of racism, imperialist stance, Indophobic bias, anti-Hindu bigotry, anti-American bias, etc in the past.

Launched in October 1922, headquartered in London, and established by a Royal Charter, BBC claims to be the “world’s leading public service broadcaster”. Every UK viewer needs to have a TV License, which costs £147.


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Chelmsford Hindu Society to establish sacred temples in England

Hindus of Chelmsford are really passionate about Hinduism as a religion and have come together to form Chelmsford Hindu Society in Chelmsford, England

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Chelmsford Hindu Society
Temples of Chelmsford. Source: Wikimedia Commons

England, Feb 25, 2017: Hindus of Chelmsford are really passionate about Hinduism as a religion and have come together to form Chelmsford Hindu Society in Chelmsford, England. They believe firmly in the values and creeds of Hindu religion, and their objective is to establish a sacred shrine in the vicinity so that it is approachable by the Hindu residents. It is observed that there are no Temples in the area and Hindus residing in the area find it difficult to travel up to 22 miles to visit one, hence the need to establish a temple.

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Temples are a place of sanctity which houses positive energies. It sends out the cadence of ragas and mantras synchronized harmoniously. Chelmsford Hindu Society believes that omnipresence of God is not felt until the spirituality is not awakened, and for that reason, followers come to temples in search of tranquility. Promoting Hindu ethos, cultural and spirituality is one of the key concerns for these people.

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The Hindu society has been reportedly holding events at Little Waltham Memorial Hall. The events included prayers, recitations, children activities and community lunch. The society is also seeking volunteer donations, and making an effort to register with Charity Commission for England and Wales.

Rajan Zed, the President of Universal Society of Hinduism, cited that it was impertinent to pass on Hindu spirituality, concepts and traditions to the coming generations amidst a myriad of distractions in the consumerist society and hoped that the temple would help in inculcating a holy and spiritual sense in people. Zed further stressed by saying that, we all should focus on driving an urge to create inner peace within oneself and work towards attaining moksha (freedom of soul) by the virtue of karma.

Another belief of Hinduism preaches that people come to the temple to unite with the almighty in the truest sense.

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-prepared by Naina Mishra of NewsGram. Twitter-@Nainamishr94

 

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Hindu Temples under Threat: Kashmiri Pandits urge Centre to protect Temples in valley

The concerns of the displaced Kashmiri Pandit community seem to have been heightened by the disturbances that ensued in the valley following the killing of terrorist Burhan Wani

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A gathering of Kashmiri Pandits (1903). Image source: oldkashmirimages.blogspot.com
  • Kashmiri Pandits have urged the centre to provide security to all Hindu temples and shrines in the Kashmir valley
  • The appeal was made by a Jammu-based organisation that manages the affairs of Zeashta Devi Mandir at Zeathyar in Srinagar
  • Zeashta Devi Mandir has become a refuge for the Pandits who take shelter in the temple whenever there is unrest in the region

Srinagar, July 23, 2016: In the wake of the ongoing turmoil in Kashmir, when the curfew is continuing for the 14th day, the Kashmiri Pandits have urged the centre to provide security to Hindu temples and religious places in the Kashmir valley.

The appeal was made by a Jammu-based organisation that manages the affairs of Zeashta Devi Mandir at Zeathyar in Srinagar. “We implore the Union government to provide security cover of central security forces to all the religious places and temples across the Kashmir Valley to protect them from attacks by the undesirable and anti-national elements,” Zeashta Devi Prabandakh Committee President, Bharat Bhushan Bhat said to World Hindu News.

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Bhat added that Zeashta Devi Mandir has become a refuge for the Pandits who take shelter in the temple whenever there is unrest in the region.

Kashmiri Pandits Image Source: Wikipedia
Kashmiri Pandits. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

The concerns of the displaced Kashmiri Pandit community seem to have been heightened by the disturbances that ensued in the valley following the killing of terrorist Burhan Wani. Numerous incidents of vandalization and desecration of Hindu temples by Muslim miscreants have added to their woes. These include the recent attack on Mata Ragniya temple in Loktipura (Anantnag District) and Mata Trisupsundri temple Devsar (Kulgam District) in Kashmir, and an Aap Shambu Temple in Roop Nagar, Jammu.

Earlier this month, over 400 Kashmiri Pandits had also taken out a protest march condemning the BJP-PDP government for being unable to protect their shrines.

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“Government should be proactive in dealing with such incidents if it has to send a positive signal among the Kashmiri Pandit community,” Bhat told the World Hindu News.

According to the Kashmiri Pandit Sangharsh Samiti (KPSS), a valley-based Kashmiri Pandit organisation, 887 temples and religious places/shrines existed before 1990. 738 of them were destroyed by 1995, reported Newslaundry.com.

– by Ashee Sharma of NewsGram

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