Wednesday November 21, 2018

The lost Irish Musical Tradition Found in India

The study shows that Modern Indian horns are almost similar to many iron age European artifacts and unveils the fact that the two regions were culturally linked together 2,000 years ago

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A depiction of horn instrument. A exhibit in Salem district museum, Tamil Nadu, India.
horn instrument , Wikimedia Commons
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By Akanksha Sharma

An archaeologist examining horns from the iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions that were thought to be long deceased, is still alive in South India.

The study shows that Modern Indian horns are almost similar to many iron age European artifacts and this unveils the fact that the two regions were culturally linked together 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy Ó Foghlú , from The Australian National University (ANU) adding,”Archaeology is usually silent. I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive and living in Kerala today.”

Mr. Ó Foghlú said,“The musical traditions of south India, with horns such as the kompu, are a great insight into musical cultures in Europe’s prehistory.”

File:Jakthorn, enligt inskriptionen tillverkat av horn från den sista uroxen i Europa - Livrustkammaren - 102555.tif
An European Horn, Wikimedia Commons

He further mentioned, “And, because Indian instruments are usually recycled and not laid down as offerings, the artifacts in Europe are also an important insight into the soundscapes of India’s past.”

Related Article: The Musical bond between India and Pakistan

This discovery has lead to the idea that Europe and India had a vibrant cultural interchange with musicians from different cultures, and sharing independently has developed technology and musical style.

A carving of a celebration in Sanchi dates back to c300 BC clearly shows a group taking part in the event, playing two European carnyces (a horn with animal’s head).

The musical technique of Kerela explains some of the mysteries surrounding the horns that were unearthed in European iron-age excavations and indicate a very different musical style to the modern age western music, said Mr. Ó Foghlú.

“This was previously assumed to be evidence of shoddy workmanship. But in Indian music, this kind of dissonance is deliberate and beautiful. “Horns are used more as a rhythm instrument, not for melody or harmony in a western sense,” he added.

The research is published in the Journal of Indian Ocean Archaeology.

Akanksha Sharma is a student of Journalism in New Delhi. She currently works as an intern in Newsgram. Twitter@Akanksha.4117

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Xiaomi Focusing on Rural Retail in India

But the eight-year-old company wants to be recognised not as just another smartphone company and it began working towards this mission in 2014

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Xiaomi
Xiaomi wants to change rural retail in India with new business.

Chinese electronics major Xiaomi, which is focusing on amplifying its product portfolio beyond smartphones, is all set to launch on Tuesday a new business which, according to the company, will “change rural retail in India”.

“Excited about a new business that we are launching. We’ll announce it tomorrow,” Manu Kumar Jain, Vice President, Xiaomi Global and Managing Director, Xiaomi India, revealed in a tweet on Monday.

“This new business will forever change rural retail in India,” he stressed.

Started with the online-only strategy, Xiaomi is fast expanding its presence in offline retail as well.

In September, the company launched its fourth flagship “Mi Home” experience store in the country, in Bengaluru, along with a new office.

“With the launch of a new ‘Mi Home’ experience store, we aim to bring maximum international products to the Indian markets,” Jain said at the time of the launch.

The complaint alleged that Xiaomi had used the patents without any license from Yulong.
Started with the online-only strategy, Xiaomi is fast expanding its presence in offline retail as well, wikimedia commons

With the purpose of strengthening its offline network further, Xiaomi said in September it wanted to open 100 “Mi Home” stores in 2018 itself.

Known for its low-cost phones, the company shipped 11.7 million units and became the top brand in the Indian market with 27.3 per cent share in the third quarter this year, with Samsung at second spot, according to an International Data Corporation (IDC) report last week.

The company grew to a new high on the back of its successful Redmi 5A and Redmi Note 5 Pro series and refreshed Redmi 6/A/Pro portfolio, said the report.

Also Read- Apple Makes a Deal with Amazon, Which is Win-Win Game For Both

But the eight-year-old company wants to be recognised not as just another smartphone company and it began working towards this mission in 2014.

Along with its products in the smart home portfolio, its is also venturing into non-technology related segments like luggage, shoes, apparel and more. (IANS)