Friday November 15, 2019
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Apply Chocolate for Skin Enrichment

Aakriti Kochar, Beauty and Makeup Expert, Oriflame India, and Mehar Rajput, Nutritionist and Dietitian from FITPASS, share tips on how chocolates can provide fruitful benefits for your skin

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Dark Chocolate helps in improving skin texture, giving you a more smooth and moisturised skin. Pixabay

Not only is eating chocolates good for your body, applying it to your skin, face or body can provide a lot of benefits as well for better and smoother skin tone, suggest experts.

Aakriti Kochar, Beauty and Makeup Expert, Oriflame India, and Mehar Rajput, Nutritionist and Dietitian from FITPASS, share tips on how chocolates can provide fruitful benefits for your skin.

* Chocolates are rich in anti-oxidants which helps in reversing the signs of ageing.

* They have anti-inflammatory properties which makes it extremely suitable for very sensitive and dry skin.

* Dark Chocolate helps in improving skin texture, giving you a more smooth and moisturised skin.

* Chocolates contain flavanols, antioxidants that protect your skin from UV damage, free radicals and improve skin hydration.

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Chocolates are rich in anti-oxidants which helps in reversing the signs of ageing. Pixabay

* Flavanols are phytonutrients that help in reducing blood pressure, cholesterol level, reducing the risk of heart diseases, controlling blood sugar level and moisturising & softening of the skin.

* Chocolate when combined with caffeine, which is an excellent anti- inflammatory product, is ideal for treating water retention.

* Chocolate facial is a new fad introduced in the beauty and personal care industry. It not only can improve the skin tone, but is also great in reducing wrinkles and fine lines.

Also Read: Dark Chocolate Your Key to Healthy Heart

* Mix 1/3rd cup of cocoa powder with 2-3 tablespoon of honey and add a few lemon drops to it. Apply this chocolate face mask on your face evenly and leave it for about 15-20 minutes before washing. This will give your skin a smoother and clearer tone along with a radiant glow.

* It can slow down the process of ageing by stopping or slowing down the action of free radicals. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Skin Exposure to UVB Light Alters Gut Bacteria For Good: Study

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome

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UVB Light causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, it has so far been shown only in rodents. Pixabay

Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans — possibly via vitamin D which can help explain the protective role of UVB in inflammatory diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Sun exposure, vitamin D levels and the mix of bacteria in our gut are each associated with risk of inflammatory conditions like MS and IBD, said scientists from University of British Columbia.

Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome.

However, that UVB, therefore, causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, has so far been shown only in rodents.

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome.

Healthy female volunteers were given three, one-minute sessions of full-body UVB exposure in a single week.

Before and after treatment, stool samples were taken for analysis of gut bacteria – as well blood samples for vitamin D levels.

Skin UVB exposure significantly increased gut microbial diversity, but only in subjects who were not taking vitamin D supplements.

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Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome. Pixabay

“Prior to UVB exposure, these women had a less diverse and balanced gut microbiome than those taking regular vitamin D supplements,” reported Professor Bruce Vallance, who led the University of British Columbia study.

“UVB exposure boosted the richness and evenness of their microbiome to levels indistinguishable from the supplemented group, whose microbiome was not significantly changed”.

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the analysis suggests that vitamin D mediates the change — which could help explain the protective effect of UVB light in inflammatory diseases like MS and IBD.

The largest effect was an increase in the relative abundance of “Lachnospiraceae” bacteria after the UVB light exposures.

This indicates that vitamin D at least partly mediates UVB-induced gut microbiome changes.

The study is not designed to show the exact mechanism by which the microbiome changes occur, but both UVB and vitamin D are known to influence the immune system.

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Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans. Pixabay

“It is likely that exposure to UVB light somehow alters the immune system in the skin initially, then more systemically, which in turn affects how favourable the intestinal environment is for the different bacteria,” suggests Vallance.

ALSO READ: Re-Assessing The Classical West: Two Emperors And A Sign

The results have implications for people who are undergoing UVB phototherapy, said scientists. (IANS)