Saturday July 21, 2018
Home Science & Technology Bacterial inf...

Bacterial infection in pregnancy may up autism risk in kids

0
//
41
autism
Bacterial infection in pregnancy may up autism risk in kids. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

New York, September 15, 2017: Babies born to mothers who experience a bacterial infection severe enough to require hospitalisation during pregnancy may be at higher risk of developing autism, a study has found.

The study, conducted on mice, revealed that the composition of bacterial populations in the mother’s digestive tract can influence whether maternal infection leads to repetitive behaviour and impaired sociability — autistic-like behaviours in offspring.

Further, irregularities that the researchers call “patches” are most common in a part of the brain known as “S1DZ” and were responsible for the behavioural abnormalities seen in mice.

“We identified a very discrete brain region that seems to be modulating all the behaviours associated with this particular model of neurodevelopmental disorder,” said Gloria Choi, Assistant Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in the paper appearing in the journal Nature.

A second study in the same jounal, revealed that not all mothers who experience severe infection end up having child with autism, and similarly not all the mice in the maternal inflammation model develop behavioural abnormalities.

“This suggests that inflammation during pregnancy is just one of the factors. It needs to work with additional factors to lead all the way to that outcome,” Choi said.

Moreover, the researchers found that only the offspring of mice with one specific type of harmless bacteria, known as segmented filamentous bacteria, had behavioural abnormalities and cortical patches.

When the researchers killed those bacteria with antibiotics, the mice produced normal offspring.

If validated in human studies, the findings could offer a possible way to reduce the risk of autism, which would involve blocking the function of certain strains of bacteria found in the maternal gut, the researchers noted. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Being Positive During Pregnancy May Lead to Kids Being in Shape: Study

For the study, the researchers analysed responses from 7,000 parents about their personality, mood and attitude during pregnancy

0
pregnancy
The results showed that a mother's psychological background during pregnancy is a factor associated with teenage weight gain. Pixabay

Did you know even your mood and attitude during pregnancy can have an effect on the body weight of your children when they grow up? A new study has found that teenagers are less likely to be overweight if their mother or father had a positive attitude during pregnancy.

Negative attitude, or a lack of self-belief in your ability to bring in changes to your lifestyle through your actions, may be associated with unhealthy weight gain in your children during teenage years, suggests the study published in the International Journal of Obesity.

“We’ve been able to show that a lack of self-belief in a parent’s ability to influence change by healthy eating, stopping smoking or breast feeding is a contributing factor to their child being overweight by the time they are 15,” said lead study author Jean Golding, Professor at University of Bristol in Britain.

For the study, the researchers analysed responses from 7,000 parents about their personality, mood and attitude during pregnancy.

Similar answers from their children at age of eight and the child’s fat mass measurement up to the age of 17 were also analysed.

Pregnant woman
Pregnant woman. Pixabay

The results showed that a mother’s psychological background during pregnancy is a factor associated with teenage weight gain.

The study examined a personality attribute known as the Locus of Control. It is a psychological measure for an individual’s attitudes towards their lifestyle and a belief in being able to change outcomes, such as health, through their own actions.

Someone with an external Locus of Control would feel that there is little point in making an effort as what happens to them is due to luck and circumstance.

Also Read: thyroid Dysfunction May Lead to Diabetes During Pregnancy

The researchers found that teenagers at age 15 had an excess weight of actual fat to the extent of 1.7 kg if their mothers did not think their actions would make a difference and held a laissez-faire attitude.

If their fathers had this attitude the excess weight of fat was 1.49 kg and if the child later thought this way the excess was 1.5 kg, the study said.

“This is important research for health campaigners looking to change behaviours and the next steps should be looking at the differences between parents who managed to change their Locus of Control compared to those who did not change,” Golding added. (IANS)

Next Story