Thursday November 14, 2019
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Barbie Ventures Into Coding Skills To Encourage Girls to Learn Coding Skills

The lessons, for example, show girls how to build robots, get them to move at a dance party, or do jumping jacks

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Barbie
Barbie. Pixabay

Barbie, the world’s most iconic doll, is venturing into coding skills in her latest career as a robotics engineer.

The new doll, launched Tuesday, aims to encourage girls as young as seven to learn real coding skills, thanks to a partnership with the kids game-based computing platform Tynker, toymaker Mattel said.

Robotics engineer Barbie, dressed in jeans, a graphic T-shirt and denim jacket and wearing safety glasses, comes with six free Barbie-inspired coding lessons designed to teach logic, problem solving and the building blocks of coding.

The lessons, for example, show girls how to build robots, get them to move at a dance party, or do jumping jacks.

Four robotics engineer Barbies are seen flanked by a robot.
Four robotics engineer Barbies are seen flanked by a robot. VOA

According to U.S. Department of Commerce statistics, 24 percent of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) jobs were held by women in 2017.

Barbie has held more than 200 careers in her almost 60-year life, including president, video game developer and astronaut.

Also read: Is Barbie doll hypersexualized? It was meant to be

Tynker co-founder Krishna Vedati said in a statement that the company’s mission to empower youth worldwide made Barbie an ideal partner “to help us introduce programming to a large number of kids in a fun engaging way.”

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No Gender Difference In Brain Function: Study

No difference in brain activities among both boys and girls

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Brain
the research team from Carnegie Mellon University comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls. Pixabay

Researchers have found similar patterns of brain activity in both boys and girls as they engage in basic math problems.

For the study, published in the journal Science of Learning, the research team from Carnegie Mellon University comprehensively examined the brain development of young boys and girls.

Through brain imaging, their research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability.

“We see that children’s brains function similarly regardless of their gender. So hopefully we can recalibrate expectations of what children can achieve in mathematics,” said study researcher Jessica Cantlon from Carnegie Mellon University in the US.

For the findings, Cantlon and her team conducted the first neuroimaging study to evaluate biological gender differences in the math aptitude of young children.

Her team used functional MRI to measure the brain activity in 104 young children (3-to 10-years-old; 55 girls) while watching an educational video covering early math topics, like counting and addition.

The researchers compared scans from the boys and girls to evaluate brain similarity.

In addition, the team examined brain maturity by comparing the children’s scans to those taken from a group of adults (63 adults; 25 women), who watched the same math videos.

After numerous statistical comparisons, they found no difference in the brain development of girls and boys.

Brain
Through brain imaging, research shows no gender difference in brain function or math ability. Pixabay

In addition, the researchers found no difference in how boys and girls processed math skills and were equally engaged while watching educational videos.

Finally, boys’ and girls’ brain maturity were statistically equivalent when compared to either men or women in the adult group.

The researchers also compared the results of the ‘Test of Early Mathematics Ability’, a standardised test for 3- to 8-year-old children, from 97 participants (50 girls) to gauge the rate of math development.

Also Read- My Little Genius: A Campaign To Focus On Kids’ Creativity

They found that math ability was equivalent among the children and did not show a difference in gender or with age. (IANS)