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By NewsGram Staff Writer

President Pranab Mukherjee today said that concerted efforts are needed to tackle the issue of terrorism which has assumed serious proportions and threatens the international community.

The above remarks were made by the President while addressing the Officer Trainees of 2013 Batch of the Indian Foreign Service, who called on the President in Rashtrapati Bhavan on 27 May, 2015.

The President said extremists appear to have access to abundant arms and resources through drug trafficking and other criminal activities. The trouble spots in the world are spreading rapidly and many important cities are being threatened. There is not only danger to historical and civilizational relics in these cities, but their collapse also becomes a symbol of political destabilisation. Despite Cold War having come to an end, the desired peace and tranquillity is still far from the reach of the people of the world.

Describing the current global situation as extremely complex, the President said simplistic approaches will not be sufficient to understand current trends. Indian diplomats should take note of developments in the world with utmost speed. They should develop the ability and expertise to understand and analyse them.

Describing the Civil Service as a great opportunity to serve the nation and people, the President recalled how officers of the Indian Foreign Service have done an outstanding job at great risk to their own safety and security in situations like Lebanon and more recently in Yemen where Indian nationals had to be evacuated. He said these operations conducted with the support of a number of services and organizations testify to the skill and competence of the Foreign Service.

The President called upon the young diplomats to pay special attention to Non Resident Indians whom he described as an important factor in India’s diplomacy. He said NRIs represent India’s values, culture and civilisation in the countries that they live in and also project our soft-power.

The President said foreign policy is an extension of enlightened national interest in the context of the prevailing situation. Diplomats should not only protect but also enhance the national interest. He concluded calling upon the young diplomats to serve the nation and its people with commitment and dedication.


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