Drinking Three or More Servings of Caffeinated Beverages a Day Increases Risk of Migraine

In a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers evaluated the role of caffeinated beverages as a potential trigger of migraine

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Caffeinated, Beverages, Migraine
Drinking three or more servings of caffeinated beverages a day increases the risk of migraine. Pixabay

Coffee lovers, please take note. Drinking three or more servings of caffeinated beverages a day increases the risk of migraine.

In a study published in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers evaluated the role of caffeinated beverages as a potential trigger of migraine.

They found that, among patients who experience episodic migraine, one to two servings of caffeinated beverages were not associated with headaches on that day, but three or more servings of caffeinated beverages may be associated with higher odds of migraine headache occurrence on that day or the following day.

“While some potential triggers – such as lack of sleep – may only increase migraine risk, the role of caffeine is particularly complex, because it may trigger an attack but may also help control symptoms, caffeine’s impact depends both on dose and on frequency,” said Elizabeth Mostofsky from Harvard University.

Caffeinated, Beverages, Migraine
Coffee lovers, please take note. Pixabay

During the study, 98 adults with frequent episodic migraine completed electronic diaries every morning and every evening for at least six weeks.

Every day, participants reported the total servings of caffeinated coffee, tea, soda and energy drinks they consumed, as well as filled out twice daily headache reports detailing the onset, duration, intensity, and medications used for migraines since the previous diary entry.

Participants also provided detailed information about other common migraine triggers, including medication use, alcoholic beverage intake, activity levels, depressive symptoms, psychological stress, sleep patterns and menstrual cycles.

To evaluate the link between caffeinated beverage intake and migraine headache on the same day or on the following day, researchers used a self-matched analysis, comparing an individual participant’s incidence of migraines on days with caffeinated beverage intake to that same participant’s incidence of migraines on days with no caffeinated beverage intake.

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The researchers further matched headache incidence by days of the week, eliminating weekend versus week day habits that may also impact migraine occurrence.

Self-matching also allowed for the variations in caffeine dose across different types of beverages and preparations.

“One serving of caffeine is typically defined as eight ounces or one cup of caffeinated coffee, six ounces of tea, a 12-ounce can of soda and a 2-ounce can of an energy drink,” Mostofsky said.

“Those servings contain anywhere from 25 to 150 milligrams of caffeine, so we cannot quantify the amount of caffeine that is associated with heightened risk of migraine. However, in this self-matched analysis over only six weeks, each participant’s choice and preparation of caffeinated beverages should be fairly consistent,” Mostofsky added. (IANS)

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Here’s How You Can Tackle Obesity And Stay Healthy During Lockdown

One needs to maintain good health during the time of lockdown

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Obesity
Here's how you can deal with obesity during lockdown. Pixabay

The pandemic has contributed to an increase in obesity rates as weight loss programmes (which are often delivered in groups) and referred interventions such as surgery are being severely curtailed. We bring to you some Health Tips-

Importantly, the current crisis and the need for self-isolation is prompting many to rely on processed food with longer shelf life (instead of fresh produce) and canned food (with higher quantities of sodium). One might notice an increase in weight if this pattern of lifestyle persists for a longer period of time.

So what should a person do to stay healthy and make one stronger in these times? Dr Sharad Sharma, Laparoscopic and Bariatric Surgeon, Hiranandani Hospital, Vashi gives a few recommendations:

Proper nutrition and hydration are vital

Those who consume a well-balanced diet are healthier and are able to build stronger immune system. A healthy diet limits the risk of chronic illnesses and infectious diseases

It is recommended to eat a variety of fresh and unprocessed foods every day to accomplish the body’s requirement of necessary Vitamins, Minerals, Dietary Fiber, Proteins and Antioxidants

Consume whole grains and legumes – this also reduces the risk of Diabetes

Drink ample water � at least 5 liters per day

Avoid sugar, fat and salt to significantly lower your risk of being overweight, and obese

Do not consume sugar-sweetened beverages & limit intake of oily food

obesity
One should avoid sitting for a long time and in every 20 minutes, move around for 3-5 minutes. Pixabay

Staying active

While the stay at home order has restricted our outdoor movements, it is important for people of all ages and abilities to be as active as possible.

Avoid sitting or slouching all the time

Every 20 minutes, move around for 3-5 minutes; walk or stretch-this will help reduce the strain on a muscle, relieve any form of mental tension and will help circulate blood to the body.

Read More: Understand Your Kids’ Perspective to Make Them Exercise

Muscle activity increases if you are physically active, reducing the risk of speedy weight gain.

More vigorous free exercises are also great ways to remain active at home.

In current times focusing on good health, food habits and maintaining some level of physical activity will go a long way in warding off obesity. (IANS)

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Here Are Some Health-Boosting Beverages Which You Can Try

Want to have a quick, refreshing drink that also boosts your health and immunity? Look no further

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Beverages
Beverages can make you feel refreshed and energized. Pixabay

Want to have a quick, refreshing drink that also boosts your health and immunity? Look no further, these recipes don’t come out of a bottle and are healthier options suggests Chef Ayesha Nallaseth, Culinary Product Specialist, Tupperware India.

Banana Walnut Shake

Ingredients:

Half tropical cup banana,
peeled and quartered
1 cup milk
2 tbsp walnuts
chopped
4-5 ice cubes
Honey to drizzle

Method: Chop the banana and walnut. Add the mixture to Tupperware Quick Shake, pour milk, honey and ice cubes and shake well till well incorporated and serve immediately.

Tip: Complete food for the nerves, muscle, immunity and brain to save them from damage and boost recovery.

Ultimate Green Smoothie

Ingredients:

1 cup soy milk/almond milk
1 cup spinach leaves
1 banana
1 tbsp peanut butter

Breakfast Drink, Almond, Cocoa, Nibs, Shake, Banana
Healthy beverages may actually boost your immunity and help you stay fit in long run. Pixabay

Method: Add the spinach leaves banana and peanut butter and finely chop. Add ice cubes to quick shake add the above mix and soy or almond milk and shake well. Serve chilled.

Kahwa tea

Ingredients:

2 cups water
1 Tsp tea leaves
2 tsp sugar
4 green cardamom
1 pc Cinnamon stick,
4 to 5 strands saffron (optional)

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Method: Boil water add the tea leaves and sugar and strain and pour it in the flask. Then add the cardamom, cinnamon sticks and saffron strands.

Close the flask. Serve using smidgets as a welcome drink. (IANS)

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Aspirin May Be Considered As a Safer Option To Treat Migraine, Says Study

Migraines can last anywhere from four to 72 hours and may occur as many times as several times a week to only once a year

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aspirin
High-dose aspirin, in doses from 900 to 1,300 milligrams given at the onset of symptoms, is an effective and safe treatment option for acute migraine headaches. Pixabay

Aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to other, more expensive medications to treat acute migraines as well as prevent recurrent attacks, a new study suggests.

The review, published in the American Journal of Medicine, includes evidence from 13 randomised trials of the treatment of migraine in 4,222 patients and tens of thousands of patients in prevention of recurrent attacks.

The findings suggest that high-dose aspirin, in doses from 900 to 1,300 milligrams given at the onset of symptoms, is an effective and safe treatment option for acute migraine headaches.

In addition, some but not all randomised trials suggest the possibility that daily aspirin in doses from 81 to 325 milligrams may be an effective and safe treatment option for the prevention of recurrent migraine headaches. “Our review supports the use of high dose aspirin to treat acute migraine as well as low dose daily aspirin to prevent recurrent attacks,” said study researcher Charles H. Hennekens from Florida Atlantic University in the US.

“Moreover, the relatively favourable side effect profile of aspirin and extremely low costs compared with other prescription drug therapies may provide additional clinical options for primary health care providers treating acute as well as recurrent migraine headaches,” Hennekens added. Common symptoms of migraine include a headache that often begins as a dull pain and then grows into a throbbing pain, which can be incapacitating and often occurs with nausea and vomiting, and sensitivity to sound, light and smell.

Migraines can last anywhere from four to 72 hours and may occur as many times as several times a week to only once a year. “Migraine headaches are among the most common and potentially debilitating disorders encountered by primary health care providers,” said study first author Bianca Biglione.

Headache, Migraine, Medicine, Tress, Head, Pain, Woman
Aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to other, more expensive medications to treat acute migraines as well as prevent recurrent attacks, a new study suggests. Pixabay

“In fact, about one in 10 primary care patients present with headache and three out of four are migraines. Aspirin is readily available without a prescription, is inexpensive, and based on our review, was shown to be effective in many migraine patients when compared with alternative more expensive therapies,” Biglion added.

Approximately 36 million Americans suffer from migraine headaches and the cause of this disabling disorder is not well understood. There is a higher prevalence in women (18 per cent) than men (nine per cent). In women, the prevalence is highest during childbearing age.

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According to the researchers, approximately 90 per cent of migraine sufferers report moderate to severe pain, with more than 50 per cent reporting severe impairment or the need for bed rest as well as reduced work or school productivity. (IANS)

One response to “Aspirin May Be Considered As a Safer Option To Treat Migraine, Says Study”

  1. This is a complete joke. Real migraines cannot be treated by any amount of OTC analgesics like aspirin. Try asking on the big facebook migraine support groups with 15,000+ members if anyone can get anything approaching relief from any amount of aspirin. You will be in for a rude awakening. Mega-doses of aspirin and the other OTC analgesics won’t touch a migraine. You might as well eat a bag of M&M’s.

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