Tuesday May 22, 2018

Eye sight detection becomes easy with Foldable Phoropter now

The test on the device was carried on 100 people and it showed a strong correlation between its reading and those taken with a clinical setting with the usual ophthalmologist tools.

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Hyderabad, March 17, 2017: The novel innovation in the field of medical has been regarded as a boon for billions of people facing eye impairments. The invention is called ‘Foldable Phoropter’- a mere foldable cardboard tube which makes the eye testing much simpler in the developing countries. The device is created by the Srujana Center for Innovation, L V Prasad Eye Institute (Hyderabad).

The disposable, open-source device is a palm-sized invention conventionally used as an ophthalmologist’s tool to sift for refractive errors like short or long sightedness. The invention inspired by Google Cardboard and Dr. Manu Prakash’s Foldscope.

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The sole intention of the project is to help diagnose the errors quickly and cheaply in the less financially efficient areas. Ashish Jain, an industrial designer with Srujana Center for Innovation at L V Prasad Eye Institute along with the institute’s team of optometrists, vision scientists and engineers have originated a unique paper device which can detect a refractive error – one of the most common causes of blindness.

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As per the World Health Organization, 153 million live vision impairment to uncorrected refractive errors. Visual impairment can have ill-effects on children and adults such as dropped educational and employment opportunities and diminished quality of life. The further findings insinuate that approximate of 670 million people worldwide do not have spectacles or adequate correction, covering 517 million with near vision impairment and 153 million with distance vision impairment. Out of 517 million people without spectacles for near vision correction, 410 million are dissuaded from performing near-vision tasks and activities.

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The Folding Phoropter is aiming to rural low-income communities.The phoropter appears like a telescope and is measured using the most common refractive error ranges. The test on the device was carried on 100 people and it showed a strong correlation between its reading and those taken with a clinical setting with the usual ophthalmologist tools. The device is easy to assemble and anyone can build their own following the instructions.

USAGE OF FOLDABLE PHOROPTER

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLYuTMFo2Os

The lenses require being located in their assigned positions and folded along the lines. The two parts line up inside one another, resembling a telescope. The patient needs to look through the device from the fixed distance and move the outer chamber inwards until the image just comes into focus.

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Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Eat Less Saturated, Trans Fats to Curb Heart Disease: WHO

An active adult needs about 2,500 calories per day, Branca said

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The World Health Organization said Friday that adults and children should limit their intake of saturated fat — found in foods such a meat — and trans fat — found in foods such as french fries.
The World Health Organization said Friday that adults and children should limit their intake of saturated fat — found in foods such a meat — and trans fat — found in foods such as french fries. The World Health Organization said Friday that adults and children should limit their intake of saturated fat — found in foods such a meat — and trans fat — found in foods such as french fries. VOA

Adults and children should consume a maximum of 10 percent of their daily calories in the form of saturated fat such as meat and butter and one percent from trans fats to reduce the risk of heart disease, the World Health Organization said Friday.

The draft recommendations, the first since 2002, are aimed at reducing non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases, blamed for 72 percent of the 54.7 million estimated deaths worldwide every year, many before the age of 70.

“Dietary saturated fatty acids and trans-fatty acids are of particular concern because high levels of intake are correlated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases,” Dr. Francesco Branca, Director of WHO’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, told reporters.

The dietary recommendations are based on scientific evidence developed in the last 15 years, he added.

The United Nations agency has invited public comments until June 1 on the recommendations, which it expects to finalize by year-end.

Junk food.
Junk food. Pixabay

Saturated fat is found in foods from animal sources such as butter, cow’s milk, meat, salmon and egg yolks, and in some plant-derived products such as chocolate, cocoa butter, coconut, palm and palm kernel oils.

An active adult needs about 2,500 calories per day, Branca said.

“So we are talking about 250 calories coming from saturated fat and that is approximately a bit less than 30 grams of saturated fat,” he said.

That amount of fat could be found in 50 grams (1.76 oz) of butter, 130-150 grams of cheese with 30 percent fat, a liter of full fat milk, or 50 grams of palm oil, he said.

Trans fats

Trans fats occur naturally in meat and dairy products. But the predominant source is industrially-produced and contained in baked and fried foods such as fries and doughnuts, snacks, and partially hydrogenated cooking oils and fats often used by restaurants and street vendors.

In explicit new advice, WHO said that excessive amounts of saturated fat and trans fat should be replaced by polyunsaturated fats, such as fish, canola and olive oils.

Also Read: Lipid Accumulation in The Brain May Be an Early Sign of Parkinson’s Disease

“Reduced intake of saturated fatty acids have been associated with a significant reduction in risk of coronary heart disease when replaced with polyunsaturated fatty acids or carbohydrates from whole grains,” it said.

Total fat consumption should not exceed 30 percent of total energy intake to avoid unhealthy weight gain, it added.

The recommendations complement other WHO guidelines including limiting intake of free sugars and sodium. (VOA)