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FBI-Affiliated Portals Information Made Public by Hackers

The hackers "exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation's chapter websites - which we're not naming - and downloaded the contents of each web server," the report said.

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The hackers "exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation's chapter websites - which we're not naming - and downloaded the contents of each web server," the report said. Pixabay

A group of hackers has broken into several FBI-affiliated portals and uploaded the contents online that contained personal information of federal agents and law enforcement officers.

According to a TechCrunch report late Friday, the hackers breached three websites associated with the FBI National Academy Association located at the FBI training academy in Quantico, Virginia.

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The hackers, whose identity is still unknown whether they are an independent group or nation-state actors, used public exploits, indicating that “many of the websites they hit weren’t up-to-date and had outdated plugins”. Pixabay

The hackers “exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation’s chapter websites – which we’re not naming – and downloaded the contents of each web server,” the report said.

The hacker claimed to have “over a million data” on employees across several federal agencies and public service organisations in the US.

They also put the data up for download on their own website.

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The data contains member names, a mix of personal and government email addresses, job titles, phone numbers and postal addresses. Pixabay

“We hacked more than 1,000 sites. Now we are structuring all the data, and soon they will be sold. I think something else will publish from the list of hacked government sites,” a hacker told TechCrunch.

The data contains member names, a mix of personal and government email addresses, job titles, phone numbers and postal addresses.

Also Read: Facebook Messages Inscribed on Internal Components Through Virtual Reality

The hackers, whose identity is still unknown whether they are an independent group or nation-state actors, used public exploits, indicating that “many of the websites they hit weren’t up-to-date and had outdated plugins”.

The FBI was yet to speak on the incident. (IANS)

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Passwords on Sensitive Account Are Still Easy To Guess

The most common name to be used in passwords was "Ashley", followed by "Michael", "Daniel", "Jessica" and "Charlie".

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"Nobody should protect sensitive data with something that can be guessed, like their first name, local football team or favourite band," Pixabay

Millions of people are using easy-to-guess passwords on sensitive accounts, with “123456” being the most widely-used on breached accounts, suggests a security study.

The study by the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) helped to uncover the gaps in cyber-knowledge that could leave people in danger of being exploited, the BBC reported on Sunday.

For its first cyber-survey, the NCSC analysed public databases of breached accounts to see which words, phrases and strings people used.

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Security expert Troy Hunt, who maintains a database of hacked account data, said picking a good password was the “single biggest control” people had over their online security.
Pixabay

Top of the list was “123456”, appearing in more than 23 million passwords. The second-most popular string, “123456789”, was not much harder to crack, while others in the top five included “qwerty”, “password” and “1111111”.

The most common name to be used in passwords was “Ashley”, followed by “Michael”, “Daniel”, “Jessica” and “Charlie”.

When it comes to Premier League football teams in passwords, “Liverpool” came first and “Chelsea” second. “Blink-182” topped the charts of music acts.

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For its first cyber-survey, the NCSC analysed public databases of breached accounts to see which words, phrases and strings people used. Pixabay

People who use well-known words or names for a password put themselves people at risk of being hacked, said Ian Levy, technical director of the NCSC.

“Nobody should protect sensitive data with something that can be guessed, like their first name, local football team or favourite band,” he said.

Also Read: Violent Relationships Can Increase The Risk Of Mental Disorder in Women

Security expert Troy Hunt, who maintains a database of hacked account data, said picking a good password was the “single biggest control” people had over their online security.

“We typically haven’t done a very good job of that either as individuals or as the organisations asking us to register with them.” (IANS)