Sunday September 22, 2019
Home Lead Story FBI-Affiliate...

FBI-Affiliated Portals Information Made Public by Hackers

The hackers "exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation's chapter websites - which we're not naming - and downloaded the contents of each web server," the report said.

0
//
hacker
The hackers "exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation's chapter websites - which we're not naming - and downloaded the contents of each web server," the report said. Pixabay

A group of hackers has broken into several FBI-affiliated portals and uploaded the contents online that contained personal information of federal agents and law enforcement officers.

According to a TechCrunch report late Friday, the hackers breached three websites associated with the FBI National Academy Association located at the FBI training academy in Quantico, Virginia.

hacking

The hackers, whose identity is still unknown whether they are an independent group or nation-state actors, used public exploits, indicating that “many of the websites they hit weren’t up-to-date and had outdated plugins”. Pixabay

The hackers “exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation’s chapter websites – which we’re not naming – and downloaded the contents of each web server,” the report said.

The hacker claimed to have “over a million data” on employees across several federal agencies and public service organisations in the US.

They also put the data up for download on their own website.

hacking
The data contains member names, a mix of personal and government email addresses, job titles, phone numbers and postal addresses. Pixabay

“We hacked more than 1,000 sites. Now we are structuring all the data, and soon they will be sold. I think something else will publish from the list of hacked government sites,” a hacker told TechCrunch.

The data contains member names, a mix of personal and government email addresses, job titles, phone numbers and postal addresses.

Also Read: Facebook Messages Inscribed on Internal Components Through Virtual Reality

The hackers, whose identity is still unknown whether they are an independent group or nation-state actors, used public exploits, indicating that “many of the websites they hit weren’t up-to-date and had outdated plugins”.

The FBI was yet to speak on the incident. (IANS)

Next Story

The Ways Girls And Boys Get Into Hacking is Quite Different

While kids with low self-control, are more likely to hack, the ways girls and boys get into hacking could be quite different

0
hacking, girls, boys, cyber crime, cyber security
For boys, we found that time spent watching TV or playing computer games were associated with hacking. Pixabay

While kids with low self-control, or not having the ability to hold back when opportunity presents itself, are more likely to hack, the ways girls and boys get into hacking could be quite different, says a new study.

“For girls, peer associations mattered more. If she has friends who shoplift or engage in petty forms of crime, she’s more likely to be influenced to hack as well,” said lead study author and cybercrime expert Thomas Holt from Michigan State University in the US.

“For boys, we found that time spent watching TV or playing computer games were associated with hacking,” Holt said.

Holt assessed responses from 50,000 teenagers from around the world to determine predictors of hacking.

He said that some of the findings show how kids are raised within gender roles, such as letting boys play video games and giving girls different activities.

For boys and girls, simply having opportunities to hack were significant in starting such behaviour.

This could include having their own bedroom, their own computer or the freedom of doing what they want on the internet without parental supervision.

hacking, girls, boys, cyber crime, cyber security
For boys and girls, simply having opportunities to hack were significant in starting such behaviour.
Pixabay

While most schools have computer and Internet access, Holt explained that there are still some geographic barriers for kids to enter cybercrime.

The researchers found that kids who had mobile phone access early on were more likely to hack — especially if they lived in larger cities.

Spending time with peers was more likely to influence delinquent behaviour for those living in smaller cities, said the study published in the journal Crime & Delinquency.

ALSO READ: New Apple Updates to Arrive on 24 September, Says Report

The researchers also found a connection between pirating movies and music and hacking.

It’s important for parents to understand their kids’ tech-savviness and habits to help guide them on a path that uses their skills in a more positive way.

“Parents shouldn’t assume that having a kid with sophisticated technological competency is always totally fine,” Holt said. (IANS)