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Five Important Eras in Indian History: How the Indian Map was drawn and redrawn!

Amateur historian named Thomas Lessman takes into account the change in the map of India from 1 AD to the 20th century

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Representational Image. Image source: www.youtube.com

Ever wondered how much the Indian map changed over time?

It’s not only the India-Pakistan partition I talk about; it’s the change in the map of India from 1 AD to the 20th century. An amateur historian named Thomas Lessman has caught these series of shifts. His maps provide a vivid history; they start from 1 AD till the rule of the Delhi Sultanate.

On his Website, Lessman says ” I started drawing maps right after I started reading about history. My earliest maps were crude hand-drawings, but now I’ve got a good computer, a great image program (PhotoShop), and a nice background map. I became frustrated while researching history because it’s hard to find great maps. The best maps are in books that cost more than I make in a week… So I realised if I want free World History Maps, I’d have to make them myself”, mentioned Scroll.in May 2015.

Map of India. Image Source: Thomas Lessman
Map of India. Image Source: Thomas Lessman

Here the important eras are taken into account that changed the look of map of India:

i. The Indo-Parthian and Indo-Synthian era: 1 AD

If one follows the above map, we can see that there exist Indo-Parthian rule and the Indo-Synthian kingdom during this era. Indo-Greeks ruled India for over two centuries, however, the Indo-Scythians migrated from southern Siberia and displaced the Indo-Greeks.

ii. The Kushan Empire: 100 AD

The 100 AD marked the era of Kushan Empire. It was founded under Kujula Kadphises but it was under his grandson, the Buddhist emperor Kanishka, that it reached its peak.

iii. The Gupta and Huna Empire: 400 – 500 AD

Some people called the period from 400-500 AD the ‘Golden Age of India.’ This was the period, which marked the domination of The Gupta and Huna Empire – 400 – 500 AD. The word Golden Age comes from the fact that during this time, literature, art, astronomy, and math flourished in the region.

iv. The Chalukyas: 600 AD

They dominated over southern and central India from 6th to 12th century. The key aspect of this era was the Chakulyan architecture, which along with Kannada and Telugu literature thrived all along their time.

v. The Ghaznavid Empire: 1206–1526

The Ghaznavid Empire moved in and conquered India and finally the Delhi Sultanate. The Delhi Sultanate was a Delhi-based Muslim kingdom that stretched over large parts of the country. The fall of Ghaznavid Empire eventually led to the rise of the Mughal rule in India.

– prepared by Karishma Vanjani of Newsgram. Twitter: @BladesnBoots

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)