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Home Router Devices Were Compromised By Foreign Hackers Says FBI

The announcement did not provide any details about where the criminals might be based, or what their motivations could be.

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cyber security
The FBI warned on Friday that foreign cyber criminals had compromised "hundreds of thousands" of home and small-office router devices around the world

Foreign cyber criminals have compromised “hundreds of thousands” of router devices around the world, the FBI announced Friday.

The FBI warned on Friday that foreign cyber criminals had compromised “hundreds of thousands” of home and small-office router devices around the world which direct traffic on the internet by forwarding data packets between computer networks.

In a public service announcement, the FBI has discovered that the foreign cyber criminals used a VPNFilter malware that can collect peoples’ information, exploit their devices and block network traffic.

fbi
It said the malware is hard to detect, due to encryption and other tactics. Pixabay

The announcement did not provide any details about where the criminals might be based, or what their motivations could be.

“The size and scope of the infrastructure by VPNFilter malware is significant,” the FBI said, adding that it is capable of rendering people’s routers “inoperable.”

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It said the malware is hard to detect, due to encryption and other tactics.

The FBI urged people to reboot their devices to temporarily disrupt the malware and help identify infected devices.

People should also consider disabling remote management settings, changing passwords to replace them with more secure ones, and upgrading to the latest firmware. (VOA)

Next Story

Networked Freezers at Stores, Work Places at Hacking Risk: Report

Earlier this week, cameras from US-based manufacturer of smart home products Nest were also reported to have been taken over by hackers who were broadcasting potentially terrifying messages

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Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals
Representational image. Pixabay

Using default passwords on internet-enabled temperature control systems has exposed freezers at grocery stores, hospitals and pharmaceutical firms to the risk of being hacked, the media reported.

Security researchers at Safety Detective found over 7,419 networked thermostats manufactured by Scotland-based electronics manufacturer Resource Data Management (RDM) to be suffering from the vulnerability, Engadget reported on Friday.

On hijacking these devices, the hackers are able to adjust temperatures, change alarms and obtain floor places of facilities where the freezers are located.

Programming
It is very simple to set up, and works by creating code in blocks. Pixabay

The issue with RDM products comes from users failing to follow the necessary steps to secure their products.

“When approached by Safety Detective about the issue, RDM said the issue is related to the use of default passwords and users are encouraged to change them,” the report said.

Also Read- Apple, Google Face Criticism For Hosting Saudi Woman- tracking App

Earlier this week, cameras from US-based manufacturer of smart home products Nest were also reported to have been taken over by hackers who were broadcasting potentially terrifying messages. (IANS)