Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
zeenews.india.com

New Delhi, There was no eye-catching bright colorful flowing turban this year, that had made as much an impact as Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Independence Day speech last year.


zeenews.india.com

Modi, whose sartorial preferences have been much written about, chose a subdued creamish-yellow turban this year, matching with his simple cream coloured churidaar-kurta and jacket.
Matching his dress sense, the fiery rhetoric which had galvanised his supporters through elections and governance in the first year has undergone a change.
The intense delivery was replaced with a ‘team India’ approach which credited the nation with achievements and the greatness to come, rather than the “me, mine, myself” eloquence so typical of the man who brought his party to power through a high octane campaign, and which carried on in his speeches for a year.


People did notice and comment on his earlier approach. It was former Jammu and Kashmir chief minister Omar Abdullah who had hit the nail on its head by once saying that for Modi the “whole thing was about being me, myself and I alone”.
On Independence Day last year, Modi’s fervent speech had made as much impact as his bright red and green headgear. His appeal of Make in India, of abolishing the Planning Commission, setting up toilets for all among other pronouncements had caught on – and there was much applause, including from among the over 150 foreign diplomats who had crowded around to hear the then new leader of India.

His visit to the US last September was talked about not only for his meeting with President Barack Obama and his speech at the UN General Assembly, but also his frequent change of attire. Those following the prime minister would notice him in a changed suit or churidar-kurta and bright jacket for every occasion – and the Prime Minister’s Office tweeted pictures of all his meetings with dignitaries.

Modi’s sartorial choice became one of the most talked about event during Obama’s India visit in January, when he wore a pin-striped suit with his name on it – that fetched the prime minister enormous amount of flak, not the least from opposition parties which tried to paint him as a man of form, rather than substance.

The “Rs.10 lakh suit”, was gifted by a businessman and was later auctioned off, but the attacks did not end. ‘Suit-Boot ki sarkar’ became a war-cry of Congress trying desperately to find a chink in the armour of a man who had reduced the party to its lowest-ever tally in the Lok Sabha
Sitting along side Barack Obama watching Republic Day parade this year, Modi made an eye-catching picture, attired in a black bandh-gala suit, and topped with a green and red bandhani turban with a red frill at the top. He also wore a pair of stylish shades in contrast to the US President who was attired in a simple dark blue suit.

Perhaps in the aftermath of the disapproval he received for the pin-striped suit, Modi has, over the months, become markedly spartan in his attire, even on foreign jaunts. So has his grandiloquence. The few schemes he announced this year appeared to be a case of reality catching up with hyperbole.

Modi had confessed in interviews earlier that he likes to mix and match his wardrobe and experiments with colour. The experiments seems to have been given up. He now largely wears dark coloured bandh-gala suits or simple churidar-kurtas for his meetings.
In another marked change this year – there was no jostling, eager crowd to hear Modi’s Independence Day speech. Is this the beginning of ennui among the people?

(IANS)


Popular

IANS

The aim of the book is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

By Siddhi Jain

Delhi-based author Pritisha Borthakur is set to release her new book, 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories'. The 1,404-word children's book was put together to address a new kind of societal debacle in the family system. The author says the aim is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

The author who named the book after her twin sons -- Puhor and Niyor -- is a parent who has seen and heard the tales of ridicule and discrimination suffered by many in India and beyond. She says the book is an artistic illustration for kids that details how different families can live and coexist. Whether it's children with two dads or two moms, children with a single dad or single mom, and even multiracial family units, Borthakur's book teaches love, understanding, and compassion towards unconventional families.

Beyond race, gender, color, and ethnicity which have formed the bases for discrimination since the beginning of time, this book aims to bring to light a largely ignored issue. For so long, single parents have been treated like a taboo without any attempt to understand their situations; no one really cares how or why one's marriage ended but just wants to treat single parents as villains simply for choosing happiness and loving their children.

Homosexual parents, a relatively new family system, is another form that has suffered hate and discrimination for many years. Pritisha emphasizes the need to understand that diversity in people and family is what makes the world beautiful and colourful. 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race, and even differences in background

four children standing on dirt during daytime 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race and even differences in background. | Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Lina Trochez on Unsplash

Clean and maintained hands boost confidence in daily life activities.

If you feel that clean and well-groomed hands are just an essential prerequisite for women, you might like to think twice. Men should equally pay attention to their hands because our hand houses 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of its skin. You can easily assume what havoc it can create in our body because in India we have the culture of eating with our hands and spaces beneath nails can become breeding heaven for germs. Moreover, clean and maintained hands boost confidence in their daily life activities. Therefore, it's important to keep your hands clean irrespective of your gender by washing or sanitizing at regular intervals. And, to keep them groomed, you don't have to visit a salon.

Rajesh U Pandya, Managing Director, KAI India, gives easy and completely doable tips to follow at home:

* Refrain from harsh soaps: You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. Your soap can have a moisturizing element in it like aloe vera or shea butter. Ensure that you're washing your hands with normal water as hot water can make your hand's skin dry and scaly.

Soap bars organic You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. | Photo by Aurélia Dubois on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Dmitry Demidko on Unsplash

Bitcoin has become an essential crypto asset in modern portfolios and investment funds.

Bitcoin has become an essential crypto asset in modern portfolios and investment funds. The confidence generated in this cryptocurrency will depend a lot on the diversification that companies make in their balance sheets in Bitcoin and the increase of institutional investors that allocate a percentage of their funds in this crypto. American fund manager Cathie Wood makes some interesting predictions, both in the rise that the Bitcoin price will experience in the next 5 years, suggesting these institutional investors allocate 5% of their funds; this will help leverage the Bitcoin market.

Bitcoin will grow by a tenfold

Keep reading... Show less