Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
The growth in mobile gaming was led not by serious gamers, but rather by casual and hyper-casual gamers. Pixabay

Amid the pandemic, especially the everything-from-home year, mobile gaming took off spectacularly in India. For consumers trying to deal with the prolonged social isolation, along with all the anxiety and ambiguity of the last year, mobile gaming provided a creative outlet. From my vantage point, I know of loved ones and peers who took to mobile games more fervently during the past year.

As we complete the pandemic anniversary, let us ponder over what is actually driving mobile gaming, and what does the future portends. As smartphones continue to be the central nervous system of human lives, the dependence on phones for work, for learning, and most importantly, for unwinding and socializing through gaming rose during the last year. Much before the pandemic, mobile gaming was on the upswing, driven by the ubiquitous smartphones and the availability of low-cost data.


Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

At CyberMedia Research (CMR), our ongoing research around gaming has thrown some interesting insights. For instance, mobile gaming in India is driven by an array of gamer personas, ranging from the serious to the hyper-casual gamers. The growth in mobile gaming was led not by serious gamers, but rather by casual and hyper-casual gamers.

The democratization of gaming can be traced to smartphone usage. With smartphones, the need for dedicated gaming hardware devices is not felt. No consoles required. Additionally, mobile gaming apps evoke a sense of familiarity with consumers. Think Puzzles. Or card games. With the ease of access to such ‘freemium’ gaming apps online, more users than before, who typically do not identify themselves as ‘gamers’ have taken up gaming.


With smartphones, the need for dedicated gaming hardware devices is not felt. Pixabay

Our research points out the gaming intents vary across consumer cohorts. For instance, serious gamers primarily play to ‘relieve stress’, while casual and hyper-casual gamers seek to have ‘fun’. The choice of games is dictated by recommendations from friends and family. Social networking and social messaging platforms are two of the prominent channels for consumer awareness around new games.

Today’s gamers have, on average, close to seven games installed on their mobile phones. Among these, there are at least four games that they play avidly. Interestingly, men prefer to unwind with mobile games in the early evening, while women mostly chose to play late at night. On average, the duration of gaming play spans close to 90 minutes. Indians have traditionally enjoyed freemium offerings and seek value. The spike in-game time during the pandemic led many gamers to veer towards paid gaming apps.

ALSO READ: Report: 1 In 2 Mobile Users In India Are Hooked To Gaming

For instance, six out of 10 serious gamers chose paid gaming apps, while others continued to use ‘freemium’ apps. Amidst the nationwide lockdown in early 2020, the use of paid gaming increased by 15 percent, while ‘freemium’ gaming apps increased by a mere 8 percent. It will be interesting to see how this trend pans out in 2021 and beyond. ‘Freemium’ will probably continue to be the mainstay.

When it comes to smartphones, today’s gamers seek more — more RAM, better battery life, increased storage, faster touch response, and better processors. Smartphone brands are responding to the evolving mobile gaming needs. They seek to differentiate themselves with a focus on high refresh rates for smoother performance, enhanced displays, and bigger batteries, among others. As we look ahead, mobile gaming will only continue to become more mainstream. In doing so, it will become more exciting, more immersive, and more social than before.(IANS/JC)


Popular

IANS

The Centre will launch a pilot project on the use of indigenously manufactured drones for delivering medicines in the undulating landscape of Jammu and surrounding areas from Saturday

The Centre will launch a pilot project on the use of indigenously manufactured drones for delivering medicines in the undulating landscape of Jammu and surrounding areas from Saturday with a focus on vaccines delivery initially. "This is going to be a pilot project for the area. The drone is developed and manufactured entirely by our scientists," Union Minister for Science & Technology, Dr Jitendra Singh told mediapersons. Singh said he himself will be launching the project at Jammu.

The drone is developed by the scientists at Bengaluru's National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL), a constituent of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), an autonomous Society that is headed by the Prime Minister. For now, the delivery would be limited to Covid vaccines and once successful, it would be expanded to be used for regular delivery of medicines in the remote, hilly areas.

drone flying in sky The drone is developed by the scientists at Bengaluru's National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL). | Photo by Jason Blackeye on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
IANS

According to him Amitabh Bachchan is a great actor in the industry.

Bollywood actor Abhishek Bachchan shares how he feels when people compare him with his father Amitabh Bachchan on the singing reality show 'Sa Re Ga Ma Pa'. He also requests contestant Rajshree Bag to sing a track 'Bahon Mein Chale Aao' featuring his mother Jaya Bachchan.

Abhishek said after looking at the performance of Rajshree, who is often compared with Lata Mangeshkar on the show, that she reminds him of being compared with his father. "Rajshree, whenever I have got the chance to watch the show, I've seen people compare you to Lata didi. It actually reminded me about how people compare me with my father and ask me how I feel about it."

According to him Amitabh Bachchan is a great actor in the industry and this is what he says to everyone making these comparisons. "My answer to them is that there's no greater actor in this film industry than Amitabh Bachchan and if I'm being compared to him, I am sure I must have done something good."

"Similarly, your voice has a different kind of magic like Lata ji and that's why people are comparing your voice with her. I feel you should always take this as a compliment," he concluded. 'Sa Re Ga Ma Pa' airs on Saturday and Sunday on Zee TV. (IANS/ MBI)


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Winters in India have always beckoned for that hot, steaming bowl of tomato and pepper rasam or the mellow, millet based Raab.

By IANSlife

Winters in India have always beckoned for that hot, steaming bowl of tomato and pepper rasam or the mellow, millet based Raab. Certain dishes like sarson ka saag, undhiyu, nimona pulao are winter specialites in the country. Seasonal food has always been an Indian speciality -- we switch our choice in fruits, vegetables, sometimes even grains with the onset of different season. The preference of using specific ingredients during certain climates is visible in our sweets as well. It's common to find local and traditional delicacies made of jaggery, instead of sugar during the winters. Case in point -- the Nolen Gur Rasgulla, a speciality made in Odisha and West Bengal between November to February.

Sarson Ka Saag | Sarson ka saag is traditional Punjabi dish Certain dishes like sarson ka saag, undhiyu, nimona pulao are winter specialites in the country. | Flickr

Keep reading... Show less