Wednesday October 24, 2018

Indian Ocean Band’s Rahul Ram Said He Doesn’t Mind Doing Music In Bollywood

Since the band came into existence in 1990, it has showcased dominance over music by blending in rhythms and tunes of different instruments into their music and coming out with edgy sounds.

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Rahul says he seeks inspiration for his music from life. Wikimedia
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“I don’t mind doing music in Bollywood. We have been lucky as people have been allowing us to do what we want. The working style is different as people set the mood and lyrics, but it is still fun,” Rahul told IANS.

“We won’t be the ones making item numbers as that is not our core skill. We are non-mainstream Bollywood with occasional performances,” he added.

Apart from doling out albums like “Desert Rain”, “Kandisa” and “Tandanu”, the band has rendered music for films like “Black Friday”, “Peepli Live” and “Masaan”.

We are non-mainstream Bollywood with occasional performances," he added.
“We won’t be the ones making item numbers as that is not our core skill.” said Rahul. Wikimedia

Since the band came into existence in 1990, it has showcased dominance over music by blending in rhythms and tunes of different instruments into their music and coming out with edgy sounds. The band performed at Flyp@MTV cafe on Wednesday.

Rahul says he seeks inspiration for his music from life.

“Life events inspire me, as life evolves events evolve. It is difficult to point to a particular thing or event. I don’t take inspiration from the music I hear but things which happen around me,” he added.

Read More: The Trailer of Rajinikanth’s new Film ‘Kaala’ Shows He Is Serious About Politics

He feels EDM (electronic dance music) has taken over the Indian music scene.

“A lot more venues and avenues as opportunities, festivals and live playing venues have mushroomed. TV and radio is almost dead and everything happens on the web, even though it is cheaper and easier to produce music but you have to fight with a thousand listeners for your share, a lot of types of music has come up — biodiversity and styles in music forms,” he added. (IANS)

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YouTube Becomes The Most Used Application For Music: Report

This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face.

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The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

If you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube.

A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.

And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.

Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.

YouTube
The content-sharing platform is also adding a tool, thus, allowing creators to add or remove non-skippable advertisements in bulk. Pixabay

But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.

The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.

The report published Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.

It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16- to 24-year-olds reaching 94 percent.

The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.

YouTube
YouTube music will separate the movies and music section on the platform. Pixabay

But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to the radio.

Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.

“This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face — both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.

The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music.”

Also Read: Google Maps Gets A New Update That Lets You Access Music

It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.

Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said. (VOA)