Monday March 18, 2019
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iPhone app measured blood flow better in cardiac assessment

The researchers compared the use of a heart-rate monitoring application (the Instant Heart Rate application version 4.5.0 on an iPhone 4S)

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iPhone X owners who are facing problem with the FaceID unlock scanner may get a new device if their smartphone cannot be repaired, a report has claimed.
Apple iPhone. IANS

Scientists have used an app on iPhone 4S to assess blood flow in a wrist artery for patients undergoing coronary angiography that performed better than the traditional physical examination. The smartphone app had a diagnostic accuracy of 94 percent compared with 84 percent using the traditional method.

Although this application is not certified at present for use in healthcare by any regulatory body, “our study highlights the potential for smartphone-based diagnostics to aid in clinical decision-making at the patient’s bedside,” said Dr Benjamin Hibbert from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa.

There are 29 types of blood groups in reality.
This test will help in assessing cardiac problems.

Researchers used the smartphone’s camera function to reach the conclusion, according to a randomised trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

“Because of the widespread availability of smartphones, they are being used increasingly as point-of-care diagnostics in clinical settings with minimal or no cost,” said Hibbert.

“For example, built-in cameras with dedicated software or photodiode sensors using infrared light-emitting diodes have the potential to render smartphones into functional plethysmographs [instruments that measure changes in blood flow],” he added.

Also Read: Apple working with partners on foldable iPhone

The researchers compared the use of a heart-rate monitoring application (the Instant Heart Rate application version 4.5.0 on an iPhone 4S) with the modified “Allen” test, which measures blood flow in the radial and ulnar arteries of the wrist, one of which is used to access the heart for coronary angiography.

A total of 438 participants were split into two groups. One group was assessed using the app and the other was assessed using the Allen test. “The current report highlights that a smartphone application can outperform the current standard of care and provide incremental diagnostic yield in clinical practice,” Dr Hibbert wrote.

A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia. Wikimedia Commons
This app can be revolutionary. Wikimedia Commons

“However, while smartphones aren’t designed as medical devices, it is important that they are evaluated in the same rigorous manner by which we assess all therapies and diagnostic tests,” noted lead author Dr Pietro Di Santo. IANS

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Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care," said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine. 

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smart watch
The study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. Pixabay

Apple Watch can detect and notify users when they experience irregular heart rhythms, finds a study demonstrating the ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation.

In 2017, Apple had partnered with researchers from the Stanford University and launched an app called “Apple Heart Study” to determine whether a mobile app that uses data from a heart rate pulse sensor on the Apple Watch can identify atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, a deadly and often undiagnosed condition, can lead to strokes. The condition often remains hidden because many people do not experience symptoms.

smart watch

Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value. Pixabay

The findings showed only 0.5 per cent participants received irregular pulse notifications, an important finding given the concerns about potential over-notification.

Eighty-four per cent of the time participants who received irregular pulse notifications were found to be in atrial fibrillation at the time of the notification and 34 per cent who followed up by using an ECG patch over a week later were found to have atrial fibrillation.

“The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care,” said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine.

apple
“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. Pixabay

“Atrial fibrillation is just the beginning, as this study opens the door to further research into wearable technologies and how they might be used to prevent disease before it strikes — a key goal of precision health,” Minor said.

Also Read: Study Reveals Solar Cells Can Retain Most Of Their Power Conversion Efficiency in Near Space

Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value.

“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. (IANS)