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Pink City Jaipur. Image Source: experienceauthenticindia.wordpress.com
  • Established by the ruler of the Amber kingdom, Sawai Jai Singh, the city is interestingly nicknamed as the ‘Pink City’
  • The credit of designing this royal town goes to Vidyasagar Bhattacharya, a Brahmin scholar from Bengal
  • Apart from the architectural marvels, the city also accommodates a number of temples

Built in the late-1700s, Jaipur was India’s first planned city. Located in the eastern Rajasthan, the royal town is known for its architectural marvels and aesthetic beauty.

Established by the ruler of the Amber kingdom, Sawai Jai Singh, the city is interestingly nicknamed as the ‘Pink City.’ The tale behind its name is also a remarkable one. The city earned the name around 1905-1906 when the Prince of Wales visited Jaipur. In a desperate attempt to revamp the town it was decided that the city would be repainted. However, owing to lack of sufficient hues, the entire city was covered in pink shade, mentioned the scmp.com article.


Notably, Jaipur is a part of India’s ‘Golden Triangle’ of must-visit destinations, along with Delhi and Agra. With fantastic attractions spread across the city, its rich cultural heritage is reflected the best in its architecture and monuments.

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The credit of designing this royal town goes to Vidyasagar Bhattacharya, a Brahmin scholar from Bengal. Bhattacharya constructed these architectural charms in line with the science of Indian structural design ‘Shilpa Shastra.’

Apparently, the city was constructed in nine rectangular blocks. Seven out of these were built for civic purposes and the remaining two for palaces and state buildings. The city was protected by the city wall and the entrance was through seven burly gates.


Tourists visiting Jaipur. Image source: www.jaipuronline.in

According to the pinkcity.com report, it took almost four years to finish the major palaces, roads and squares of the city.

Some of the stellar monuments from the city are:

  • Built in 1592, Amber Fort displays a beautiful amalgamation of Rajput and Mughal style of architecture. Brimming with the greenery of the Aravalli Range Valley, the fort is at its best during the spring or summer season. Tourists generally enjoy the view from the hilltop complex on an elephant, from where they can see the structure’s four distinct areas.
  • The fort’s primary attractions include an impressive hall, the Sheesh Mahal that is covered with several tiny mirrors and Shila Devi Temple, which has magnificent silver doors.
  • Other two exquisite castles in the vicinity of the fort are –Jaigarh and Nahargarh. Housing world-record-sized cannon called Jaivana, Jaigarh is a castle with fortified red walls.
  • Accounting for the waning splendour of the Madhavendra Bhawan palace, Nahargarh is one of the most visited edifices in Jaipur.
  • Other pieces of brilliant architecture in the town include multi-storeyed City Palace complex and the mirage-like Jal Mahal. Interestingly, the City Palace complex still serves as a royal residence.

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  • Unesco World Heritage-listed, Jantar Mantar, is another remarkable monument in the city. Constructed as an observatory in the 1720s, the stone fabrications designed as sophisticated instruments were used to quantify time, trail stars, and calculate the coming of eclipses in early days.
  • Apart from these monuments, the city also accommodates a number of temples. Govind Dev Ji, Moti Dungri or Galtaji are some of the most renowned temples in Jaipur.

-prepared by Bulbul Sharma, a staff-writer at NewsGram. Twitter handle: iBulbul_

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