Saturday November 23, 2019

Joint Surgery May Spike up Blood Sugar Levels in Diabetics

Haemoglobin A1c above 6.59 for people with insulin-dependent diabetes and 6.6 without the condition was associated with an elevated risk for post-operative hyperglycemia

0
//
Knee Joint. Pixabay.

People with diabetes who undergo joint replacement surgery are at higher risk of experiencing elevated blood sugar levels after the operation, increasing their chances of developing infections and other complications, a new study suggested.

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes were more than five times as likely as those without the condition to develop hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, after surgery, said researchers, including Bradford Waddell from the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in the US.

“If your patient comes in with diabetes and is dependent on insulin, you need to be more cognizant of controlling their blood sugar in the perioperative period because they’re at higher risk,” said Waddell.

For the study, presented at the 2019 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the team reviewed medical charts of 773 men and women who had undergone total hip or knee replacement surgeries between 2011 and 2016.

Of those, 437 had insulin-dependent diabetes, while 336 had not the condition. It included patients with a diagnosis of diabetes whose blood sugar was being controlled using the hormone insulin and compared them with diabetics who did not require insulin.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Patients requiring insulin can be considered to have more severe diabetes and have a greater chance of experiencing elevated blood glucose in the perioperative period, Waddell said.

Patients with higher blood glucose over the previous three months — as measured by Hemoglobin A1c — were more likely to experience post-operative hyperglycemia regardless of which group they were in.

Also Read- Excessive Hygiene Can Cause Antibiotic Resistance, Says Study

Hemoglobin A1c above 6.59 for people with insulin-dependent diabetes and 6.6 without the condition was associated with an elevated risk for post-operative hyperglycemia.

However, despite the increased risk for elevation in blood sugar after surgery, the incidence of post-operative joint infections did not differ between the two groups of patients. The author also noted that a limitation of the study was that it was underpowered to detect the risk of infection. (IANS)

Next Story

Study Says, Early Signs of Diabetes Can be Observed in Children

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s

0
Diabetes
The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 Diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible. Pixabay

Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old.

Type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in middle age or later, with its symptoms slowly developing over many years.

“It’s remarkable that we can see signs of adult diabetes in the blood from such a young age, this is about 50 years before it’s commonly diagnosed.

“This is not a clinical study; nearly all participants were free of diabetes and most will not go on to develop it. This is about liability to disease and how genetics can tell us something about how the disease develops,” said study researcher Joshua Bell from the University of Bristol in the UK.

The research was conducted among young healthy people who were generally free of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases to see how early in life the effects of diabetes susceptibility become visible.

The study tracked over 4,000 participants of the Children of the 90s study, a birth cohort established in Bristol in the early 1990s.

The researchers combined genetics with an approach called ‘metabolomics’, which involves measuring many small molecules in a blood sample to try and identify patterns that are unique to type 2 diabetes.

According to the findings, the research team analysed 162 pieces of genetic information and combined this with 200 measures of many small molecules in a blood sample, known as metabolics, to identify signs of type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes
Researchers have found that early signs of adulthood type 2 Diabetes can be seen in children as young as 8 years old. Pixabay

Data was taken once in childhood — at 8 years old, twice in adolescence aged 16 and 18 years and once in young adulthood aged 25 years.

They found levels of HDL cholesterol were reduced at age 8, while inflammatory glycoprotein acetyls and amino acids were elevated in 16 and 18 year old teenagers.

These metabolic features could be targeted to prevent young people from going on to develop type 2 diabetes in the future, the researchers said.

ALSO READ: Income Tax Officers Quit Work For Mental Peace

The findings were presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Barcelona. (IANS)