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New Delhi: It seems the leaders of Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) cannot help but use ‘puppy’ and ‘dog’ analogies while making statements. Days after MoS V K Singh’s controversial remark on the killing of two Dalit children in Haryana, BJP general secretary Kailash Vijayvargiya on Monday likened party Lok Sabha member Shatrughan Sinha to a dog.

“A dog runs after a car and thinks the car is running because of him,” Vijayvargiya told the media.


Sinha, who has been criticising the BJP for keeping him out of the Bihar elections, said there could have been some difference in the BJP’s showing in the polls had he been projected as the party’s chief ministerial candidate.

The actor-turned-politician also said, “The BJP shall be my first and probably last party. I joined this party when it had two MPs and today it commands a majority.”

In a similar case, on October 22 when asked about the gory killing allegedly by upper castes of two Dalit children in a Haryana village, the former army chief V K Singh said:

“If someone throws stones at a dog, the government is not responsible. It was a feud between two families, the matter in under inquiry. The failure of the administration should not be blamed on the government.”

Reacting to his remarks, Union Home Minister Rajanth Singh said ministers and leaders should be “extra careful” while making any statement on any sensitive issue, ensuring whatever they are saying is not “misinterpreted”.

“We can’t get away by saying that (our) statement was misinterpreted. We need to be extra careful while putting forth our views,” the home minister told media persons.

(With inputs from IANS)


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