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Lord Shiva. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

September 2, 2016: India is a multi-diversity country and despite people belonging to different castes, classes, traditions, ideas, values, and religions, they leave in harmony. Hindu Mythology is full of incidents and stories that one can relate to their own life even today. This shows how modern Hindu faith is. Amid all the stories, there is one about Lord Shiva and her unnamed sister, who he later named as Devi Asavari and that she was created by Shiva on his wife’s insistence.

India is a land where various legends and myths existed since, the very beginning. The same is applied for the Hindu Mythologies as people believed that these tales were only stories and they have no real life significance attached to it. What most of us missed is that apart from teach us the art of living, these texts also exposed the harsh realities of the dominant Patriarchal society, where people were exploited and discriminated on the basis of caste or gender. Here are few stories that will explain this better-


Lord Rama was not the first child born in the Kingdom of Ayodhya. In reality, he had an elder sister named Shanta who was abandoned and left by her father as she was a girl and not a boy. Thus, gender discrimination existed in the Indian civilisation from the beginning. – Ramayana

As according to Shiv Puranas, Lord Shiva had a sister too. Devi Asavari was created by Shiva on his wife’s insistence. As she used to miss her family madly when they were settled in Kailasha. Therefore, she requested her husband to give her a sister-like companion with whom she could share her feelings and emotions when she was lonely. She demanded this, as she was the only woman in the entire clan in Kailasha which was filled with men. Hence, Lord Shiva followed his wife’s plea on one condition that she would take care of her ‘sister -in -law’ very happily. To which, Parvati agreed.

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Soon, he created a woman similar to him with all his knowledge and power. According to various books, Devi Asavari was a very plump woman with long hair. She had cracked feet and thus, she used to wear nothing except animal skin.

After some time, Lord Shiva took his wife to his sister Devi Asavari and Parvati was overwhelmed with emotions to meet her for the first time. Devi Asavari used to eat a lot due to which the entire food storage of Kailasha was getting affected. Hence, Parvati became totally helpless and depressed as she could not meet the needs of Devi Asavari.

Devi Asavari was hard to control and very soon, Parvati got fed up with the increasing demands and rudeness of Asavari that she decided to break her promise of taking care of her sister-in-law forever. She asked forgiveness for the same from her husband.

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Therefore, Lord Shiva decided to instill his sister with some good etiquettes and then, marry her off. To which Parvati said, she has no problem with Asavari if she would behave properly with her. But, this time, her husband dismissed her suggestion saying that ” If you cannot have someone at their worst then, you must not have them at their best.” This shows that Lord Shiva was an epitome of righteousness since, he believed in giving a chance to his sister to change herself to have a better future, unlike his wife who desperately wanted a companion but, could not handle the difficult situations courageously.

– by Namra Zahid of NewsGram


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