Saturday November 25, 2017

Kun-Faya & Fun art exhibition at India Habitat Centre in Delhi

"The acrylic colors from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings"

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Painting at India Habitat Centre (Representational image, Credits-Wikimedia)

New Delhi, February 8, 2017: Artist Ghazali Moinuddin’s solo art show titled “Kun-Faya-Fun” presented the audience its vibe & ethereal colors depicting the various shades of the nature.

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Organised at India Habitat Centre in the national capital, his paintings are all landscapes which show the beauty of the Nature. From the mist trapped within the woods to the mountain peaks covered in snow, Moinuddin’s every stroke brings it all alive.

Moinuddin has not drawn any inspiration while painting this series, for him it is all about his imagination. For him, nature has no boundaries, it has freedom.

“Imagination and inspiration are contradictory for me, it is disturbing rather. My paintings depend a lot on my mood. I have not been much to any hill station in past few years but all these are an outcome of my imaginative power,” Moinuddin told IANS.

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The artist didn’t use any brush while working on the 40 paintings. “The acrylic colours from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings,” he said about his art work which took him two years to complete.

“The semi-realistic paintings create a 3D effect, the more you keep distance from the paintings, the better you can visualise it,” the artist said about his paintings.

The exhibition will go on till February 9, 2017. (IANS)

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Mahalaya: Beginning of “Devipaksha” in Bengali Celebration of ‘Durga Puja’

“Mahalaya” is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha” and heralds the celebration of Durga Puja

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Mahalaya morning in Kolkata. Flickr
  • Mahalaya 2017 Date: 19th september.
  • On Mahalaya, people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers; which is called ‘Torpon’
  • Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted in All India Radio
  • The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent

Sept 19, 2017: Autumn is the season of the year that sees the Hindus, all geared up to celebrate some of the biggest festivals of India. The festive spirit in the Bengalis all enthused to prepare for the greatest of the festivals, the ‘Durga Puja’.

About Mahalaya:

Mahalaya is the auspicious occasion that marks the beginning of “Devipaksha” and the ending of “Pitripaksha,” and this year it is celebrated on September 19.

Observed exactly a week before the ‘Durga Puja’, Mahalaya is the harbinger of the arrival of Goddess Durga. It is celebrated to invoke the goddess possessing supreme power! The goddess is invited to descend on earth and she is welcomed with devotional songs and holy chants of mantras. On this day, the eye is drawn in the idols of the Goddess by the artisans marking the initiation of “Devipaksha”. Mahalaya arrives and the countdown to the Durga Puja begins!

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The day of Mahalaya bears supreme significance to the Bengalis. The day is immensely important because on this day people throng to the holy river Ganges in order to pay homage to their ancestors and forefathers. Clad in white dhotis, people offer prayers and take dips in the river while praying for their demised dear ones. The ritual is popular as “Torpon”.

Mahalaya
An idol-maker in progress of drawing the eye in the idol of the Goddess. Wikipedia

As per Hindu myth, on “Devipaksha”, the Gods and the Goddesses began their preparations to celebrate “Mahamaya” or Goddess Durga, who was brought upon by the trinity- Brahma, Vishnu, and Maheshwara; to annihilate the fierce demon king named Mahishasura. The captivating story of the Goddess defeating the demon got popularized with the goddess being revered as “Durgatinashini” or the one who banishes all the evils and miseries of the world. The victory of the Goddess is celebrated as ‘Durga Puja’.

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Mahalaya remains incomplete without the magical chanting of the scriptural verses from the ‘Chandi Kavya’ that is broadcasted at dawn in All India Radio in the form of a marvelous audio montage enthralling the souls of the Bengalis. Presented with wonderful devotional music, acoustic drama, and classical songs- the program is also translated to Hindi and played for the whole pan-Indian listeners.

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Mahalaya
Birendra Krishna Bhadra (1905-1991). Wikipedia

The program is inseparable from Mahalaya and has been going on for over six decades till date. The magic is induced by the popular Birendra Krishna Bhadra whose voice makes the recitation of the “Chandi Kavya” even more magnificent! He has been a legend and the dawn of Mahalaya turns insipid without the reverberating and enchanting voice of the legendary man.

Mahalaya will keep spreading the magic and setting the vigor of the greatest festival of the Bengalis- the Durga Puja, to worship the supreme Goddess, eternally.

                 “Yaa Devi Sarbabhuteshu, Shakti Rupena Sanhsthita,

                     Namastaswai Namastaswai Namastaswai Namo Namaha.”

– by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC

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Exclusive: “Memesis” Depicts my Inner Feelings during the time of Pregnancy : Artist Rajni Sahni

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Rajni with her Paper Pulp Cast work made in 2003. NewsGram

– by Tusheeta Kaushik

July 31, 2017: Curated by Jitendra Padam Jain, an exhibition titled “Memesis” was a solo show of Prints and Painting by artist Rajni Sahni and was conducted at Shridharani Art Gallery at Triveni Kala Sangam from July 11th- 21st in New Delhi. “Memesis”, she says, is a representation of herself and the visual perceptions she had in her mind during the time of pregnancy.

Reporter Tusheeta Kaushik of NewsGram spoke to Rajni Sahni on how different forms of visual arts helped her in expressing her mind s visual perceptions in reality, on how art is such a potent form of creative expression which helps in soothing her mind whenever she s going through different emotions and phases in life and on how her mother found the spark and talent in her when she was a little girl.

Tusheeta: When did you realize your passion for art? When was the first time you expressed yourself through art?

Rajni: I realized my passion for art when I passed my diploma in painting from South Delhi Polytechnic College. There, an art critic appreciated it and then there was no turning back after Santiniketan. I started expressing myself through art when I found an artist in myself and that was during my Santiniketan days.

Tusheeta: Anyone or anything that inspired you to take this art form?

Rajni: As a little girl, I was inspired by my mother since she used to appreciate my work and pushed me to never stop myself from expressing through drawings and sketches. Later, as a student at South Delhi Polytechnic College for Women, Professor Jain Gajera inspired me through his works and teachings.

“Metamorphosis” | Etching on paper | 2011

Tusheeta: How did painting help you or relax you at the time of conceiving?

Rajni: Painting had a huge calming effect on me during my 9-month pregnancy! I had some critical conditions. I was there in a room for 6 months and had difficulty in moving from the bed. So, it was my husband who insisted me a lot on unleashing my pain and emotions through art. I agreed and the depiction of my imagination through the usage of different colours made me calm and composed. That s when I thought of starting a series named “Memesis” which depicts my inner feelings during the time of pregnancy. Etching, Painting, Print Making, Lithography, Paper Pulp Casting and Sculpture making are different forms of visual arts that I have worked on.   

“Saviour” | Etching on Paper | 2012

Tusheeta: You’ve mentioned about the magical relation with your daughter. How and why is it so unique and special to you?

Rajni: (Laughing) My daughter is a big critic of my art work. Her appreciation, criticism, guidance and support matters to me. She herself is great at craft making. She s in class 6th and I m glad that I m close to her and the fact that she likes sharing about her daily routine with me.

“Untitled”| Paper Pulp| 2002

 

“I ll weave my life myself ” | Viscosity on Paper | 2011

Tusheeta: You’ve talked about the complex, yet compassionate and a lovable relationship between a mother and her daughter. How this powerful relationship is depicted in your work?

Rajni: I have made a few art works showcasing my relationship with my daughter. I also have had a powerful relationship with my mother, she s been my pillar and I love my daughter immensely, that s the reason I love to showcase the beauty of a mother and daughter relationship through my art work.

Woman from the lap of woman | Paper pulp and thread on paper| 2002

 

“In the lap of nature”| Etching on Paper | 2011

Tusheeta: So, when do you usually paint and what kind of impact does painting have on you?

Rajni: See, it s not just about me as an artist. Any artist out there doesn’t t really have a regular time schedule for painting. Whenever I feel like painting, I paint. I might work on my art piece for a week then I might work on some other piece after a month. It all depends on my mood and whenever I feel like expressing something. I love painting, it has made me what I m today.

 

– reported by Tusheeta Kaushik of NewsGram. Twitter  @TusheetaKaushik

 

 

 

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“The Little Picasso” : 10-Year-Old Afghan Boy Farhad Nuri Paints and Dreams in Serbian Refugee Camp

Every child has inbuilt talent, only some get the chance of polishing it

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Farhad Nouri poses with a portrait of German Chancellor Angela Merkel in his room in the "Krnjaca" collective centre near Belgrade, Serbia, Monday, March 13, 2017. A 10-year-old boy from Afghanistan is known as Little Picasso among migrants in a Serbia asylum camp because of his artistic talent. Nouri, his parents and two younger brothers hope to move to Switzerland or the United States, but have been stuck in the Balkan country for months unable to cross the heavily guarded borders of the European Union. VOA

– by Surbhi Dhawan                                                               

June 21, 2017: With eyes bright lit, a 10-year-old Afghan Boy Farhad Nuri paints his own world of happiness and courage in a peaceful corner of the world away from his home where gunshots are loud enough to kill the child in him.

Hatred and terrorism are the villains of his life who are responsible for the abandoning the feeling of home in him. It’s not a story of a single child who is suffering and is not fortunate enough of carefree childhood; it’s a story of every child playing with the terror in plastic, tin, clothes and bamboo tents.

Every child has inbuilt talent, only some get the chance of polishing it. From poets to rappers, singers to dancers, painters to writers, name it and its present in the refugee tents. These children’s only fault is to be born at the wrong place.

Ten-year-old Farhad knows where he stands amidst the other world and his own world. He distinguishes his native country Afghanistan with other countries through his drawings. He shows Afghanistan as a lady covering and isolating his face from rest of the world and rest of the world is shown as a naked face with shining eyes and a gracious smile.

Farhad’s drawings are nothing less than of a professional artist. He has made the sketches and portraits of his heroes like Salvador Dali, the legendary artist who used to paint surrealism and Angela Merkel who opened the doors of Europe for refugees. Both these heroes are close to his heart as one describes his existing conflict between dreams and reality and other helped him in escaping terrorism.

Like every other child, Farhad too wants to excel through enhancing his talent. He wants to go to a place where his dreams can bloom without the sounds of terror and inability of refugee tents. Farhad’s family is one of the many who fled Taliban to save themselves. Farhad’s paintings clearly show that talent does not discriminate and it does not promote hatred. His paintings communicate what he and hundred others like him cannot. Don’t these children have a right to a naughty smile, a carefree play, free dreams and an assured future?

– by Surbhi Dhawan of NewsGram. Twitter @surbhi_dhawan