Thursday March 21, 2019

Kun-Faya & Fun art exhibition at India Habitat Centre in Delhi

"The acrylic colors from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings"

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Painting at India Habitat Centre (Representational image, Credits-Wikimedia)

New Delhi, February 8, 2017: Artist Ghazali Moinuddin’s solo art show titled “Kun-Faya-Fun” presented the audience its vibe & ethereal colors depicting the various shades of the nature.

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Organised at India Habitat Centre in the national capital, his paintings are all landscapes which show the beauty of the Nature. From the mist trapped within the woods to the mountain peaks covered in snow, Moinuddin’s every stroke brings it all alive.

Moinuddin has not drawn any inspiration while painting this series, for him it is all about his imagination. For him, nature has no boundaries, it has freedom.

“Imagination and inspiration are contradictory for me, it is disturbing rather. My paintings depend a lot on my mood. I have not been much to any hill station in past few years but all these are an outcome of my imaginative power,” Moinuddin told IANS.

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The artist didn’t use any brush while working on the 40 paintings. “The acrylic colours from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings,” he said about his art work which took him two years to complete.

“The semi-realistic paintings create a 3D effect, the more you keep distance from the paintings, the better you can visualise it,” the artist said about his paintings.

The exhibition will go on till February 9, 2017. (IANS)

Next Story

Reinvent House Painting Using Christmas Trees

Fresh trees and older, abandoned Christmas trees can both be used, according to the researchers.

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The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree is lit up during a ceremony on the West Front of the Capitol in Washington, Dec. 6, 2016. VOA

The use of a Christmas tree could soon go beyond the festive period as researchers have found that useful products such as paint and food sweeteners can be made from the chemicals extracted from pine needles used in the tree.

“The tree that decorated your house over the festive period could be turned into paint to decorate your house once again,” said researcher Cynthia Kartey from the University of Sheffield in Britain.

Christmas trees have hundreds of thousands of pine needles which take a long time to decompose compared to other tree leaves. When they rot, they emit huge quantities of greenhouse gases which then contribute to the carbon footprint.

CHristmas Tree
The process is sustainable and creates zero waste Pixabay

The major component (up to 85 per cent) of pine needles is a complex polymer known as lignocellulose. The complexity of this polymer makes using pine needles as a product for biomass energy unattractive and useless to most industrial processes.

“My research has been focused on the breakdown of this complex structure into simple, high-valued industrial chemical feedstocks such as sugars and phenolics, which are used in products like household cleaners and mouthwash,” said Cynthia.

The new research showed that with the aid of heat and solvents such as glycerol, which is cheap and environmentally friendly, the chemical structure of pine needles can be broken down into a liquid product (bio-oil) and a solid by-product (bio-char).

Christmas Tree
These chemicals are used in many industries. Pixabay

The bio-oil typically contains glucose, acetic acid and phenol. These chemicals are used in many industries — glucose in the production of sweeteners for food, acetic acid for making paint, adhesives and even vinegar.

The process is sustainable and creates zero waste as the solid by-product can be useful too in other industrial chemical processes, the University of Sheffield said in a statement on Thursday.

Also Read: Paint, Varnish Exposure may Increase Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

Fresh trees and older, abandoned Christmas trees can both be used, according to the researchers. (IANS)