People With Sedentary Lifestyle More Prone to Neg Outcomes Of Covid

People who live sedentary lives and have unhealthy lifestyles are more prone to Covid-related long negative health outcomes, including deaths, a new study has revealed.
People With Sedentary Lifestyle More Prone to  Neg Outcomes Of Covid.
People With Sedentary Lifestyle More Prone to Neg Outcomes Of Covid.IANS

People who live sedentary lives and have unhealthy lifestyles are more prone to Covid-related long negative health outcomes, including deaths, a new study has revealed.

The authors of the study, published in American Journal of Medicine, compared geographic maps of the US outlining Covid-19 deaths, several lifestyle behaviours, obesity and chronic conditions.

The study recognised the link between unhealthy lifestyle behaviours and the one million Covid-19 deaths in the US.

It stated there is a significant association between unhealthy behaviours and conditions such as low physician activity, obesity, diabetes and smoking, and poorer outcomes from Covid-19 infections.

With this, a pattern is evident and quite alarming for medical professionals, they wrote.

The study explained that the current state of health outcomes has been building for decades and should be considered a "syndemic", which is the simultaneous occurrence of two prevalent health conditions or endemics.

"The reality of this comparison should be quite eye-opening for many," said Dr Carl Lavie, Medical Director, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention at the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute.

"The only way to combat the asyndemic' we are experiencing is to promote healthy lifestyles and address the health needs of all, especially those in underserved communities who have been disproportionately impacted by poor outcomes related to chronic conditions and Covid-19," Lavie stressed.

Clinicians have long been aware of the link between increased mortality rates and unhealthy lifestyles.

"Individuals who live sedentary lives with poor eating habits and multiple chronic conditions are always more prone to negative health outcomes," said Lavie. (SJ/IANS)

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