Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Honey Bees. Pixabay

November 16, 2016: It can be hard to make sense of what is going on with bees around the world.

But we do know a few things: neonicotinoids, a class of pesticide used by commercial farmers in the United States, can make bees more susceptible to illness and infestation by parasites like the Varroa mite.


NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

We also know that in 2006, beekeepers began reporting a big problem: in some cases, 50 to 90 percent of the bees in their hives were just disappearing. These massive losses got the collective name Colony Collapse Disorder.

We also know that bees are big money. They pollinate an estimated 15 billion dollars of U.S. produce a year. That alone was enough to scare the heck out of farmers and grocers everywhere.

But, we also know, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, that “reported cases of CCD have declined substantially over the last five years.” And domesticated bee hives seem to be on the comeback trail.

And just about a year ago, the EPA put out an enormous reseach paper that concluded that neonicotinoids can indeed pose a risk to the health of domesticated honeybees. The report went into great detail on the effects of the most common neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, and found that neonicotinoids don’t cause much harm when used on “corn, berries and tobacco,” but can be absorbed in great enough amounts to do damage when sprayed on cotton and citrus plants. The U.S. is coming to the game pretty late because Europe banned the use of imidacloprid in 2013.

New research sheds light on how the damage is done

When you lay out all this information on paper, what becomes clear is that a lot of what’s happening in the bee world is still a mystery, especially why exactly domesticated bees are on the comeback trail. But there is no question that neonicotinoids, particularly imidacloprid, can do a lot of damage to bees when enough of it gets into their systems, and their hives and honey.

That’s the focus of some new research from University College London. VOA spoke with Glen Jeffery, one of the authors of a paper being published today in PLoS One on neonicotinoids and bees. Jeffery’s work focused on how neonicotinoids affect the bees on a cellular level, specifically how the pesticides affect mitochondria. “Mitochondria are the batteries in our cells that make the energy they need in the form of ATP,” a molecule that transports the energy, he explained. “Mitochondrial decline is a key feature of the action of the insecticide, so ATP goes down when bees are exposed to it.”

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

In other words, the pesticide pushes the bee’s cells into overdrive and they use up all their energy, and then just simply become immobile, unable to move or feed themselves and they die of starvation.

Seeing a solution in light

But science is a funny thing. Jeffery and his team were initially doing research on aging, not necessarily bees, so they knew that “…mitochondrial function can be improved with specific wavelengths of light” and light therapy was shown to improve mobility and life span in flies.

And here’s the great part: Jeffery says the idea of using a similar therapy on bees “occurred to me (a visual scientist) cycling home in the rain after reading about the mode of action of the insecticide and I thought that the light should help.”

So, he took the idea to the lab. “The researchers used four groups of bees from commercial hives, with more than 400 bees in each colony. Two groups were exposed to a neonicotinoid, Imidacloprid, for ten days, with one group also being treated with light therapy over the same period.”

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Jeffery says he was “surprised by the positive impact.” The bees that were poisoned but got light therapy “had significantly better mobility and survival rates, living just as long and functioning just as well as bees that had not been poisoned,” while the bees that didn’t get light therapy showed less mobility and higher death rates.

The team also found that the light therapy — “15 minutes of near infrared light (670nm) twice daily” — didn’t affect the bees’ behavior because they can’t see the light. So now Jeffery says he and his team are “working to develop a small device that can be fitted into a commercial hive, which could be an economic solution to a problem with very widespread implications.”

Talk about seeing the light. (VOA)


Popular

Photo found on Google Images

Savitribai Khanolkar, the designer of Param Vir Chakra

Eve Yvonne Maday de Maros, the woman who designed the Param Vir Chakra, was born in 1913 in Neuchatel, Switzerland. It was believed that she came to India to understand the country's culture and tradition.

She got to know about India's spiritual and cultural wealth at a very early age through holistic education which she received. Soon, Eve Yvonne fell in love with a Maharashtrian named Vikram Khanolkar, who was a young army officer, and was undergoing training at the Royal Military Academy in the United Kingdom.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Adam Winger on Unsplash

The whole salon environment at home believes that services at home are undoubtedly the best option during the unusual crisis.

In this world full of technological advancement where everything is now home-delivered, even the most essential beauty services are now available at your doorstep? Let the pampering sessions begin. The whole salon environment at home believes that services at home are undoubtedly the best option during the unusual crisis.

IANSlife brings you the co-founder of YES MADAM, Mayank Arya who speaks of the benefits of at-home salon services.

Comfort
We all prefer comfort over anything and everything. Nothing is more comfortable than getting everything under your own roof. One of the most amazing perks of subscribing to an at-home salon service provider is that you can watch your favourite TV show or OTT series while having your hair treated or nails done. Amidst, Covid-19 and working from home some of the beauty services can be taken simultaneously. Getting beauty services at your home keeps you relaxed and calm. During festivals when you are already busy the on-demand salon services can do wonders for your mind, body and soul.

woman lying on sofa Nothing is more comfortable than getting everything under your own roof. | Photo by Inside Weather on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Helena Lopes on Unsplash

India has been ranked 139 out of 149 countries in the list of UN World Happiness Report 2021.

By Aishwarya Jain

According to the World Happiness Report 2021 which was released by the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, Finland was once again crowned as the world's happiest country. India has been ranked 139 out of 149 countries in the list of UN World Happiness Report 2021. To make society happy, firstly it is really important to spread awareness on how it is okay to relax, chill and take a break. People tend to normalise overworking, which is so wrong. Of Course, we need a job to live and sustain ourselves but you shouldn't be working yourself to death, and the fact that this is seen as normal is really worrying. You spend more hours at work than you do awake at home, so if those hours are drenched in misery then sadness basically becomes the norm. A study from Gallup (2017) found that happier employees were more engaged, which resulted in improved customer relationships, and a 20 percent increase in sales.

Also, lowering down the crime level would act as a major factor towards a happy society. People who witness crimes, or come across evidence of a crime in their local area, can suffer anxiety and may feel demoralised or powerless. We should also teach them to stop judging people by materialistic things and accept everyone with all their flaws. Media plays an important role in making society happy because they have the power of reaching out to billions of people and helping them out through a solution-based approach.

woman in black shirt smiling beside woman in black shirt Media plays an important role in making society happy because they have the power of reaching out to billions of people and helping them out through a solution-based approach. | Photo by Dave Goudreau on Unsplash

Keep reading... Show less