Tuesday January 28, 2020

Lipid, Produced in Response to Cold by Brown Adipose Tissue in Human Body, Helps Reduce Blood Sugar

The group also observed that a drug used to treat urinary dysfunction increases the amount of 12-HEPE released into the bloodstream

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Lipid, Cold, Blood Sugar
The discovery with the lipid known as 12-HEPE can pave the way for new treatments for diabetes, said the team from Brazil, the US and Germany. Pixabay

A team of global researchers has discovered that a lipid — produced in response to cold by brown adipose tissue in the human body — helps reduce blood sugar.

The discovery with the lipid known as 12-HEPE can pave the way for new treatments for diabetes, said the team from Brazil, the US and Germany.

The group also observed that a drug used to treat urinary dysfunction increases the amount of 12-HEPE released into the bloodstream in human patients.

White adipose tissue, one of the two types of adipose tissue in mammals, including humans, stores excess energy as fat.

Lipid, Cold, Blood Sugar
A team of global researchers has discovered that a lipid — produced in response to cold by brown adipose tissue in the human body — helps reduce blood sugar. Pixabay

The other kind is brown adipose tissue, which converts energy from food into heat and contributes to thermal regulation.

The function of the lipid “12-HEPE” was unknown until the group discovered that blood sugar was reduced more efficiently in obese mice treated with 12-HEPE than in untreated mice after they were injected with a concentrated glucose solution.

According to the paper published in the journal Cell Metabolism, the beneficial effect of 12-HEPE on glucose tolerance in obese mice was due to its promotion of glucose uptake into both skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

The study’s first author is Luiz Osorio Leiria, a researcher at the University of Campinas’s Biology Institute (IB-UNICAMP) in Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

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The discovery lays a foundation for the development of new drugs to combat diabetes and possible new treatments with currently available drugs.

US researchers are currently conducting tests to measure the effects of relatively low doses of the drug on blood sugar levels. (IANS)

Next Story

Aromas Can Help Plants to Withstand Low Temperatures, Says Study

As the glucose is produced, it feeds the plant and is then gradually converted into other nutrients that promotes plant survival and growth when the temperature drops

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Plants
Cold weather is an environmental stress factor that can limit the distribution, survival and growth of various plants. Pixabay

A new Chinese study has found that adding a floral scent to tea plants may help them withstand low temperatures as aromatic plants have a strong tolerance to cold weather.

Cold weather is an environmental stress factor that can limit the distribution, survival and growth of various plants.

But the study, published in the journal New Phytologist, said that increasing the concentration of aromatic substances in tea plants can enhance their resistance to cold temperatures, Xinhua reported.

Researchers from China’s Anhui Agriculture University have discovered that nerolidol, an aromatic substance accumulated in tea plants in cold weather, can be converted into a type of glucose by key gene UGT91Q2.

Plants
A new Chinese study has found that adding a floral scent to tea plants may help them withstand low temperatures as aromatic plants have a strong tolerance to cold weather. Pixabay

As the glucose is produced, it feeds the plant and is then gradually converted into other nutrients that promotes plant survival and growth when the temperature drops, subsequently enhancing the plant’s cold tolerance.

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The discovery might have significant potential applications in the food and cosmetics sectors, said the study’s lead researcher Song Chuankui. (IANS)