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Lower Back pain reduced by muscle exercise

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Sydney: Muscles support and control the spine in a human body. A new study found that muscle exercise help to improve the coordination of muscles thus further reducing the lower back pain and disability caused by it.

Lower-back pain is one of the most common health conditions worldwide. It can have substantial health and economic costs as people experience disability and general ill health, leading them to need time off work.

“Targeting the strength and coordination of muscles that support the spine through motor control exercise offers an alternative approach to treating lower back pain,” said lead author Bruno Saragiotto from The University of Sydney, Australia.

Motor control exercise is a popular form of exercise that aims to improve coordination of the muscles that control and support the spine.

Patients are initially guided by a therapist to practise the normal use of the muscles with simple tasks. As the patient’s skill increases the exercises become more complex and include the functional tasks that the person needs to perform during work and leisure activities.

The study gathered together data from 29 randomised trials involving a total of 2,431 men and women, aged between 22 and 55 years old.

The trials investigated the impact of using motor control exercises as a treatment for lower back pain compared with other forms of exercise or doing nothing.

The researchers found that people who used motor control exercises experienced improvements, especially in pain and disability compared with minimal intervention.

“We can be confident that they are as effective as other types of exercise, so the choice of exercise should take into account factors such as patient or therapist preferences, cost and availability,” Saragiotto added.

The study was published in the journal Cochrane Library.(IANS)(Picture Courtesy:fitstar.com)

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Treatment for lower back pain poor, harmful globally: Lancet

Current treatments including opioids, injections and surgery to treat lower back pain -- the leading cause of disability globally

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treatment to back pain may be harmful locally. IANS

Current treatments including opioids, injections and surgery to treat lower back pain — the leading cause of disability globally — are useless, unnecessary and harmful, finds a series of studies in The Lancet. Globally, lower back pain affects more than 540 million people and the condition has doubled in the last 25 years.

The prevalence of the condition is expected to continue to increase with an ageing and increasingly obese population. Medical care with inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery is making the problem worse in both developed and developing countries, the findings showed.

desk job
Sitting on your work-desk for extended hours may be the reason for the shooting pain in your back and body. Pixabay

“The burden from low back pain has reached a tipping point where the condition is growing rapidly, is poorly understood and is being mismanaged medically — at cost both to the patient and to the healthcare system,” said Rachelle Buchbinder, Professor at the Monash University in Melbourne.

“Low-and middle-income countries are already emulating the low-value care that is endemic in high-income countries. “Across the globe (there is) inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections and surgery. Doing more of the same will not reduce low back pain disability nor its long term consequences,” Buchbinder said.

People with physically demanding jobs, physical and mental comorbidities, smokers, and obese individuals are at greatest risk of reporting low back pain.

Also Read: Lower Back pain reduced by muscle exercise

The researchers call for a coordinated international leadership to drive transformational change across health and social services and occupational settings to stop fragmented and outdated models of care. They also call for avoidance of the harmful and useless medical treatments through the adoption of a similar framework to drug regulation.

Public health campaigns need to address the widespread population and health professional misconceptions about the causes and prognosis of low back pain and the effectiveness of different treatments. IANS