Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Source: Google images


Source: Google images

Source: Google images

New Delhi: Despite the stand taken by the food safety watchdog, Consumer Affairs Minister Ram Vilas Paswan on Thursday said he was hopeful that Nestle’s Maggi will be back on the shelves soon, drawing comfort from favourable test reports for the top instant noodles brand from some accredited laboratories.


“The latest tests conducted by Central Food Technological Research Institute (CFTRI) has found Maggi safe. I have a gut feeling it will return to retail shelves soon,” Paswan said of the margins of a conference on fast moving consumer goods, hosted by Assocham here.

He was alluding to the test reports from the Mysore facility of the lab, which gave is report based on the samples sent to it by the Goa food safety department. The minister’s comments also come against he backdrop of the food safety regulator declining to take note of the latest report.

Paswan made it clear that consumer interest will be paramount while deciding on the matter pertaining to ban against Maggi, while expressing concern over the negative perception such developments have created in the minds of the potential foreign investors.

“I am worried. After Maggi ban the perception of people changed. Foreign investors will also now think twice before investing in India. Our credibility is at stake,” he said, adding: “But all this is possible to rectify only after addressing all concerns. The concerns of our consumers is most important.”

Speaking in Hindi, he also sought to use an analogy.

“We cannot take everything for granted. The whole Maggi episode is like what happens after the rains — pots made of mud get destroyed, but utensils made from steel and brass shine. I hope Maggi will start shining again,” he told IANS.

The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) on Wednesday said Nestle India had not been given a clean chit regarding its noodles and that its ban order of June 5 was still operative, despite a noted lab in Karnataka reportedly finding the snack to be safe.

But following the favourable test reports, Goa Deputy Chief Minister Francis D’Souza aaid he favoured a re-think on the ban since it was certified laboratory that found the popular instant noodle to be safe for consumption. “Why should you ban something when it is safe? If it was not safe I could have understood.”

India’s official food regulator on June 5 had banned the sale of Maggi after an allegedly high amount of lead and monosodium glutamate (MSG) were found in samples. Following that, Nestle withdrew all variants of the noodle, while continuing to maintain that its products were safe.

On the latest matter, Nestle has refrained from making any comment, on the ground that the matter was sub judice. The Bombay High Court is hearing the matter.

(IANS)


Popular

IANS

K'taka Hijab Row Triggers Debate.

By M.K. Ashoka

The issue of wearing a hijab (head covering worn in public by Muslim women) to the colleges along with the uniform has sparked a debate in Karnataka over religious practices impacting the education system in the state. The matter has also snowballed into a controversy on whether the hijab could be considered as part of the uniform. The ruling BJP is deliberating on whether to take a call on allowing hijab as part of the uniform of college students. State Education Minister B.C. Nagesh, while opposing the wearing of hijab to classrooms, has said that a decision would be taken on the issue soon by the government.

The experts as well as students are divided over the issue. Those who are in favour state that the dress code in classrooms should not indicate faith or religion as it creates barriers between students as well as teachers. Those who support the wearing of hijab say that hijab should be treated as a scarf. Hijab is black in colour and it can't be a religious symbol as Islam is identified with the green colour. The hijab should be treated as a symbol of chastity, they maintain.

The denial of permission to six girls in the Government Girls' Pre University College in the communally sensitive district of Udupi in the state has created a controversy. Nagesh dubbed it as a political move and questioned whether centres of learning should become religious centres. Meanwhile, the girl students have decided to continue their protest until they are allowed to attend classes wearing hijab.

Keep Reading Show less

Police have come under sustained attack around the country. | Unsplash

An Indian-American police officer, who has been on the job for just over six months, is being hailed a hero for rushing to neutralize a gunman who shot a police officer and wounded another. Sumit Sulan, 27, shot the assailant who surprised the officers opening fire on them in his mother's flat on January 21 where police were called because of a domestic dispute. Jason Rivera, 22, was killed and Wilbert Mora, 27, was wounded, but Sulan who was in the police party advanced and shot the alleged gunman, Lashawn McNeil, 47, according to police.

Also Read : Police in Spain distribute masks to commuters

Keep Reading Show less
IANS

The most common allergen in India are milk, egg and peanuts.

By Dr Nidhi Gupta

Motherhood comes with its own mixed bag of emotions; we want to save our child from every little peril that comes their way, including allergies. The most common allergen in India are milk, egg and peanuts. According to the IAP survey, 11.4 per cent children under the age of 14 years suffer from some form of allergies and they usually peak around the month of May.

The symptoms of allergy range from runny nose, sneezing, coughing, rashes, watery and red eyes to swollen tongue and breathing difficulties. A child experiences serious discomfort and it leaves the parents hopeless at times. Allergies develop slowly over time; parents need to have patience and commitment towards managing them. However, there are certain ways in which we, as parents, can contribute in prevention and possible alleviation of the problems.

* Do Not Stress

Staying stress-free and calm is very important during this time. Creating panic will only add to the misery. Once we know about the symptoms, our mandate must be to keep a first-aid antiallergic kit at home. We can make this kit with the help of our paediatrician.

Keep reading... Show less