Tuesday March 31, 2020

Common Myths and Facts About Low-Calorie Sweeteners

Here are 3 myths vs facts on the side-effects of low-calorie sweetener

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low calorie sweetners
Here are a few myths around low calorie sweeteners that we will bust. Pixabay

With the desire to stay fit and ensure a healthy lifestyle there has been an inclination towards choosing food that is low in calories. In today’s time, when most people are consciously putting an effort to try and remain fit, it is very important to consume food smartly.

Often we find that whenever we talk about a meal, we inevitably try to assess how much weight would we put on after consuming it. Most people who consult me are often concerned about their weight management and one of the most effective ways to treat this issue is by addressing the sugar element. People are conscious of consuming oily and fattening food items but forget about sugar which constitutes a major part of their daily calorie intake.

Making the move from sugar to no sugar may be impossible, sugar being a key ingredient in Indian households. Here, safe low calorie sweeteners come into play.

Low-calorie sweetener is a food additive that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy than sugar-based sweeteners, making it a zero-calorie or low-calorie sweetener (LCS). Conversations often arise and lead to the safety of switching to low calorie sweeteners and their health benefits.

Unlike popular perception, low calorie sweeteners available in the market are thoroughly investigated and their safety is confirmed by many studies. It is not possible to market a new sweetener without the approval of the competent authorities.

low calorie sweetners
Low-calorie sweeteners don’t cause weight gain and may even be actually effective for weight loss. Pixabay

In India, Low-calorie sweeteners are regulated by FSSAI. WHO approves LCS based on their claims and recommended ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake).

Here are a few myths around low calorie sweeteners that we will bust. Ishi Khosla, renowned nutritionist shares her take on the myths and facts of the effects of low calorie sweeteners. Read to know more:

 

Myth 1:

I often find people discussing that the consumption of low calorie sweeteners leads to increase in weight. Some people also believe that low calorie sweeteners might increase appetite. The idea is that low calorie sweeteners may be unable to activate the food reward pathway needed to make you feel satisfied after you eat.

Fact 1:

Evidence from controlled studies suggests that Low-calorie sweeteners don’t cause weight gain and may even be actually effective for weight loss. Safe sweeteners can support weight loss as a substitute for sugar in sweets, foods and beverages.

Myth 2:

Recently, I have heard someone say, “Don’t use sugar substitutes in your tea, coffee or food. They can cause cancer.” There’s been a lot of debate about low calorie sweeteners and these Discussions were prompted by the rise of sugar-infused drinks and foods over recent decades.

Fact 2:

The reality is no scientific studies have found a direct connection between Low-calorie sweeteners and cancer. Infact cancer is multifactorial. A much-debated sweetener described as causing cancer is aspartame. Questions on its safety arose in the mid-1990s amid a report that allegedly claimed it caused brain cancer. Yet after further analysis, no clear link between the sweetener and brain cancer was found. Neither Centers for Disease Control (CDC) or FDA was able to identify a specific set of symptoms associated with aspartame use that would constitute a public health hazard.

low calorie sweetners
Low calorie sweeteners are unlikely to cause headaches, depression and seizures. Pixabay

Myth 3:

Sometimes when I’m scrolling through my phone I come across reports that say that low calorie sweeteners may cause unpleasant symptoms, such as headaches, depression, and seizures in some individuals.

Fact 3:

Low calorie sweeteners are unlikely to cause headaches, depression and seizures as per World Health Organization report when consumed within the recommended ADI limit. FDA scientists have reviewed scientific data regarding the safety of low calorie sweeteners in food and concluded that it is safe for the general population under certain conditions. Sucralose has been extensively studied and more than 110 safety studies were reviewed by FDA in approving the use of sucralose as a general purpose sweetener for food.

Also Read- Find out How Mental Stress Can Trigger Heart Attack

Choosing the right kind of alternative sweeteners is a way of maintaining lifestyle. Sweeteners are safe for consumption within the (acceptable daily intake) ADI limit. No one approach to weight management is likely to be successful. An integrated approach and overall healthy lifestyle are essential to promote good health. (IANS)

Next Story

Most Infants Consume Added Sugar: Study

Is your toddler consuming added sugar?

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infants sugar
A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume added sugars. Pixabay

Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of toddlers between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

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She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

infants sugar
Most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns. Pixabay

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

The findings showed that toddlers consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

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” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider.Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

infants sugar
Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets. Pixabay

The findings showed that infants consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Also Read- Night-Shift Workers More Prone To Get Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider. (IANS)