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Bridenstine said a new chief of the US space agency under the new administration would be in the best interest of America's space exploration programme. Wikimedia commons

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has no intention to continue in his current position even if asked by the Joe Biden administration, said a media report.

In an interview with AerospaceDaily, Bridenstine said a new chief of the US space agency under the new administration would be in the best interest of America’s space exploration program.


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“The right question here is ‘What’s in the best interest of NASA as an agency, and what’s in the best interest of America’s exploration program?” Bridenstine was quoted as saying in the interview on Sunday.

“You need somebody who has a close relationship with the President of the U.S. … somebody trusted by the administration, including OMB (Office of Management and Budget), National Space Council, National Security Council. I think I would not be the right person for that in a new administration,” he said.


Bridenstine’s unwillingness to continue under the Biden administration gains significance especially in the context of NASA’s returning humans to Moon by 2024. Wikimedia commons

When President Donald Trump nominated the former Republican Congressman to lead NASA in 2017, many lawmakers opposed the idea of a politician heading the US space agency.

Want to read more in Hindi? Checkout: अजीम प्रेमजी, भारत के सबसे परोपकारी इंसान

The Senate, however, confirmed him in April 2018, with lawmakers voting along party lines, The Verge reported.

Bridenstine’s unwillingness to continue under the Biden administration gains significance especially in the context of NASA’s ambitious goal of returning humans to Moon by 2024 under the Artemis program.

ALSO READ: Lucknow To Celebrate The Occasion Of Mini Deepotsav

He, however, told the AerospaceDaily that there is strong bipartisan support for Artemis. (IANS)


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