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US Streaming Giant Netflix Aims to Create More Original Content

Andy Law said Netflix will continue ramping up various efforts to reach its audience through so-called "deep personalisation"

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US streaming giant Netflix Inc. said on Thursday that it aims to create more original content targeting global audiences regardless of their nationality or language.

Netflix, which started as a video rental firm in 1997, currently has over 189 million paid memberships in over 190 countries enjoying both original and licensed TV series, documentaries and feature films across a wide variety of genres and languages, Yonhap news agency reported.

“We spent $8 billion last year to create original content,” Andy Law, director of product design, told the media here, adding that Netflix is committed to providing more original shows. He did not disclose the budget allocated for this endeavour.

Netflix said it will produce more programs in languages other than English as part of efforts to fund high-quality foreign-language content and provide them to audiences around the world.

“We want to create content that can be intuitionally understood by the global audience, beyond language barriers,” Kim Min-young, a Netflix representative, said.

“Kingdom”, Netflix’s first original Korean drama, to be streamed from Friday, will have subtitles in 27 languages and be dubbed into 12 languages, with more to be added.

The six-episode zombie mystery thriller is set in the era of Korea’s last Joseon (1392-1897) dynasty, and has been written by famed Korean screenwriter Kim Eun-hee, the author of the popular 2016 TV series “Signal”.

"Sacred Games", which is an adaptation based on Vikram Chandra's 2006 thriller novel of the same name, is also the first Netflix Original from India. Flickr
“Sacred Games”, which is an adaptation based on Vikram Chandra’s 2006 thriller novel of the same name, is also the first Netflix Original from India. Flickr

“Netflix’s content crosses borders, showing our positive side,” Kim said, citing other licensed foreign-language programs such as “Elite” from Spain and the British series “Bodyguard”.

Kim said storytelling is important to reach global a audiences and that Netflix plans to create more quality local content on the back of “hallyu” or the Korean Wave.

Netflix earlier announced that its international streaming revenues exceeded domestic streaming revenues for the first time last year.

“Sixty per cent (of our membership) is from outside of the US,” said Nigel Baptiste, director of partner engagement at Netflix, adding that Asia, and South Korea in particular, is a very important market.

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He also said that the company is currently engaged in various partnerships, working with tech giants such as Samsung Electronics Co. to improve technology and convenience.

A Netflix button is available on smart TVs to improve accessibility for consumers so they can quickly find their favourite shows.

Andy Law said Netflix will continue ramping up various efforts to reach its audience through so-called “deep personalisation”. (IANS)

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Delhi High Court Dismisses Plea Seeking Regulation on Netflix, Amazon Prime

The plea had also sought an order to the ministries to direct the online platforms "to remove legally restricted content with immediate effect"

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A gardener works on the lawns of the Supreme Court in New Delhi, India, Aug. 22, 2017. India's Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has presided over a string of verdicts in recent weeks that grant more rights to women, gay couples and religious minorities as he prepares to retire from the bench next month. VOA

The Delhi High Court Friday dismissed a plea seeking framing of guidelines by government to regulate the functioning of online media streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.

A bench of Chief Justice Rajendra Menon and Justice V K Rao rejected the petition after the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting informed it that online platforms are not required to obtain any licence from the ministry.

Central government standing counsel Vikram Jetly said the content on online platforms is not being regulated by the ministry.

The court had earlier made it clear that it was not issuing notice on the petition by NGO Justice for Rights Foundation but was only seeking the government’s response on the plea which also alleged that the online media streaming platforms show “uncertified, sexually explicit and vulgar” content.

In its plea filed through advocate Harpreet S Hora, the NGO had claimed that online media streaming platforms, that also include Hotstar, show content which is “unregulated and uncertified” for public viewing.

Netflix.

The court had asked the Centre’s counsel to seek instructions as to whether the alleged broadcasting on the online platforms is based on any licence or regulatory measures provided by government or any regulatory body.

The plea had claimed that television series like “Sacred Games”, “Game of Thrones” and “Spartacus”, shown on platforms like Netflix, contain “vulgar, profane, sexually explicit, pornographic, morally unethical and virulent” content which often “depict women in objectifying manner”.

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It had sought directions to the ministries of communication, information and broadcasting as well as law and justice to frame guidelines to regulate such platforms and the content they broadcast.

The plea had also sought an order to the ministries to direct the online platforms “to remove legally restricted content with immediate effect”. (IANS)