Sunday February 17, 2019

Obesity Alone Does not Increase Death Risk: Study

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease

0
//
Adults
Soon treatment for obesity, fatty liver disease . Pixabay

Patients who have metabolically healthy obesity but are free from other metabolic risk factors do not have an increased rate of mortality, a new study has found.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Obesity, showed that unlike dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes — each one of which is related to high mortality risk — obesity alone does not pose any threat to life.

“We are showing that individuals with metabolically healthy obesity are actually not at an elevated mortality rate,” said lead author Jennifer Kuk, Associate Professor at the York University in Canada.

“We found that a person of normal weight with no other metabolic risk factors is just as likely to die as the person with obesity and no other risk factors,” Kuk added.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.
Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications. Pixabay

For the study, the research team followed 54,089 men and women from five cohort studies who were categorized as having obesity alone or clustered with a metabolic factor, or elevated glucose, blood pressure or lipids alone or clustered with obesity or another metabolic factor.

The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.

They found that one out of 20 individuals with obesity had no other metabolic abnormalities.

Also Read: Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

“This is in contrast with most of the literature and we think this is because most studies have defined metabolic healthy obesity as having up to one metabolic risk factor,” said Kuk.

“This is clearly problematic, as hypertension alone increases your mortality risk and past literature would have called these patients with obesity and hypertension, ‘healthy’. This is likely why most studies have reported that ‘healthy’ obesity is still related with higher mortality risk,” Kuk noted.

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. (IANS)

Next Story

As Per Study, High-Risk HPV Lead to Increased CVD

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD.

0
Obesity leads to high CVB in women.
women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD. Pixabay

While human papillomavirus (HPV) have been linked to cancer, infection with high-risk strains of the virus might also increase the fear of cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular problems, according to a new research.

Certain strains of HPV are considered high risk because they can increase the probability of vaginal, vulvar, penile, mouth, throat and cervical cancers.

The study showed that women with high-risk HPV were 22 per cent more likely than uninfected women to develop cardiovascular disease.

High risk HPV contributes to CVD problems.
HPV are considered high risk as they develop CVD disease. Pixabay

In addition, women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD and those with metabolic syndrome and high-risk HPV were nearly twice as likely to develop the disorder, showed results published in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Conversely, slightly more than 7 per cent of the women without CVD developed high-risk HPV infections.

Interestingly, women who smoked, consumed alcohol and reported being physically active were also more likely to have high-risk HPV. In contrast, higher education – college degree or more – was associated with a decreased likelihood of having high-risk HPV.

 

Fear of increased CVD disease is higher in obese women.
Women with obesity faces higher chances of CVD disease. Pixabay

“A better understanding of high-risk HPV as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and possible combined effects of high-risk HPV, obesity and metabolic syndrome in increasing cardiovascular disease risk may help improve preventive strategies and patient outcomes,” said Seungho Ryu, Professor at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

Further studies are required to identify specific high-risk HPV genotypes that may contribute to cardiovascular disease and to examine whether vaccine strategies to reduce high-risk HPV infection for cancer prevention may also help reduce CVD, suggested the study.

ALSO READ: Keep Obesity At Bay With Flaxseeds

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD. (IANS)