Saturday December 15, 2018

Online intervention helps teenage moms deal with depression

For both rural and urban counties, the intervention led to significant changes in attitude, intention to seek depression treatment and actually seeking treatment

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Stress during Pregnancy may cause Female Children to exhibit binge-eating-like behaviour in Adulthood. Pixabay
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  • Online intervention may reduce depression in teenage moms
  • Postpartum depression can hinder a mother’s relationship with her child
  • This condition can be very dangerous for both mother and her child

Online intervention may help improve depression treatment rates in teenage mothers, a study has found. An online programme persuaded teenage mothers across 10 Kentucky counties to seek medical help for depression, highlighting an inexpensive way to increase mental health treatment rates for the vulnerable group.

Protein responsible for postpartum depression in pregnancy found
Online intervention can help in depression in teenage moms. IANS

The website included videos of adolescent mothers describing their experiences with postpartum depression and treatment, questions and answers, and local and national resources, including referrals for counselling services and suicide and child-abuse prevention hotlines.

Untreated postpartum depression hinders a mother’s relationship with her child, her functioning at work and school, mothering skills and development.

Also Read: 5 Healthy Ways To Get Back In Shape After Pregnancy

“The condition also can harm a baby’s development and attachment to the mother,” said M Cynthia Logsdon from the University of Louisville in the US.

Half of the roughly 400,000 adolescents 18 and younger who give birth annually in the US experience depressive symptoms, but less than 25 per cent follow referrals for depression evaluation and treatment, according to the study.

It is important to treat depression during the pregnancy. Pixabay

The research, conducted from 2013 to 2016, involved more than 200 teen moms in urban, suburban and rural counties in Kentucky. Participants on average were 18 years old, primarily African-American, did not have a high school diploma and had given birth in the past year.

For both rural and urban counties, the intervention led to significant changes in attitude, intention to seek depression treatment and actually seeking treatment. IANS

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Cinema, Museums Can Keep Older Adults Away From Depression

For the study, the researchers studied more than 2,148 adults above 50

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Depression
Cinema, museums may ward off depression risk in elderly.

Regular exposure to cultural activities like cinema, theatre or museums can keep older adults away from depression, finds a new study.

Depression is a major issue affecting millions of people, especially the elderly.

The study showed that people who saw films, plays or exhibitions every few months had a 32 per cent lower risk of developing depression, with those attending once a month or more having a 48 per cent lower risk.

“People engage with culture for the pure enjoyment of doing so, but we need to be raising awareness of their wider benefits too,” said Daisy Fancourt, Senior Research Associate from the University College London in the UK.

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Depression is a major issue affecting millions of people, especially the elderly. Pixabay

The power of these cultural activities lies in the combination of social interaction, creativity, mental stimulation and gentle physical activity they encourage, according to the study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

If we are starting to feel low or isolated then cultural engagement is something simple that we can do to proactively help with our own mental health before it gets to the point where we need professional medical help, according to Fancourt.

Also Read- YouTube Removes 7.8 mn Violative Videos

“However, such activities on their own don’t treat depression. This requires an approach based on the use of talking therapies, complemented by the use of medication where an older person does not respond or when they have more severe depression,” noted Amanda Thompsell from the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

For the study, the researchers studied more than 2,148 adults above 50. (IANS)