Tuesday February 19, 2019

Online intervention helps teenage moms deal with depression

For both rural and urban counties, the intervention led to significant changes in attitude, intention to seek depression treatment and actually seeking treatment

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Stress during Pregnancy may cause Female Children to exhibit binge-eating-like behaviour in Adulthood. Pixabay
  • Online intervention may reduce depression in teenage moms
  • Postpartum depression can hinder a mother’s relationship with her child
  • This condition can be very dangerous for both mother and her child

Online intervention may help improve depression treatment rates in teenage mothers, a study has found. An online programme persuaded teenage mothers across 10 Kentucky counties to seek medical help for depression, highlighting an inexpensive way to increase mental health treatment rates for the vulnerable group.

Protein responsible for postpartum depression in pregnancy found
Online intervention can help in depression in teenage moms. IANS

The website included videos of adolescent mothers describing their experiences with postpartum depression and treatment, questions and answers, and local and national resources, including referrals for counselling services and suicide and child-abuse prevention hotlines.

Untreated postpartum depression hinders a mother’s relationship with her child, her functioning at work and school, mothering skills and development.

Also Read: 5 Healthy Ways To Get Back In Shape After Pregnancy

“The condition also can harm a baby’s development and attachment to the mother,” said M Cynthia Logsdon from the University of Louisville in the US.

Half of the roughly 400,000 adolescents 18 and younger who give birth annually in the US experience depressive symptoms, but less than 25 per cent follow referrals for depression evaluation and treatment, according to the study.

It is important to treat depression during the pregnancy. Pixabay

The research, conducted from 2013 to 2016, involved more than 200 teen moms in urban, suburban and rural counties in Kentucky. Participants on average were 18 years old, primarily African-American, did not have a high school diploma and had given birth in the past year.

For both rural and urban counties, the intervention led to significant changes in attitude, intention to seek depression treatment and actually seeking treatment. IANS

Next Story

Fathers Experience More Happiness Than Mothers in Their Parenthood, Says Study

"Fathers may fare better than mothers in part due to how they spend their time with their children," said Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Assistant Professor at the Sewanee, The University of the South in the US

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Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Fathers experience more well-being and satisfaction than mothers in their parenthood and even when interacting with their children, a new study suggests.

Researchers from the University of California in the US analysed three separate studies consisting of 18,000 people that looked at the scale of happiness, psychological satisfaction, depressive symptoms and stress among others.

The first two studies compared the well-being of parents with that of people who do not have children.

The findings published in the journal “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin”, showed that fathers reported greater satisfaction with their lives and feelings of connectedness to others.

Father and son
Father and son, Pixabay

They also reported greater positive emotions and fewer daily hassles than mothers, or relatives or peers without children.

They even showed fewer depressive symptoms than men without children, whereas mothers reported more depressive symptoms than women who do not have children.

The third study considered parenthood and well-being while engaging in childcare or interacting with children compared to other daily activities.

Men were found to be happier while caring for their children than women suggesting that gender significantly impacted the association between childcare and happiness.

Child, baby, father
A man twirls a young child on a waterfront park as downtown Seattle disappears in a smoky haze behind, Aug. 19, 2018. VOA

In terms of daily interactions also men reported greater happiness.

One possible explanation given said fathers were more likely to indicate they were playing with their children while they were caring for them or interacting with them as compared to the mothers.

Also Read- American Children Use More Toothpaste Than Recommended: Report

“Fathers may fare better than mothers in part due to how they spend their time with their children,” said Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Assistant Professor at the Sewanee, The University of the South in the US. (IANS)