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Study: Personal Care Products Lead to Life Threatening Situations in Young Children

These ingestions and exposures most often led to poisonings (86.2 per cent) or chemical burns (13.8 per cent)

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personal care products
The study found that most injuries from these products occurred when a child swallowed the product (75.7 per cent) or the product made contact with a child's skin or eyes (19.3 per cent). Pixabay

Parents, take a note. Researchers have found that personal care products such as shampoo, lotion and nail polish in the hands of young children can quickly lead to poisoning or chemical burns-like life-threatening situations.

Published in Clinical Pediatrics journal, the study found that more than 64,600 children below five years of age, were treated for injuries related to personal care products between 2002 and 2016 in the US.

“Kids this age can’t read, so they don’t know what they are looking at. They see a bottle with a colourful label that looks or smells like something they are allowed to eat or drink, so they try to open it and take a swallow. When the bottle turns out to be nail polish remover instead of juice, or lotion instead of yoghurt, serious injuries can occur,” said the study co-author Rebecca McAdams from Nationwide Children’s Hospital in the US.

personal care products
These ingestions and exposures most often led to poisonings (86.2 per cent) or chemical burns (13.8 per cent). Pixabay

The study found that most injuries from these products occurred when a child swallowed the product (75.7 per cent) or the product made contact with a child’s skin or eyes (19.3 per cent). These ingestions and exposures most often led to poisonings (86.2 per cent) or chemical burns (13.8 per cent).

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According to the researchers, the top three product categories leading to injuries were nail care products (28.3 per cent), hair care products (27.0 per cent) and skin care products (25.0 per cent), followed by fragrance products (12.7 per cent).

“Since these products are often stored in easy-to-reach places and are not typically in child-resistant containers, it is easy for kids to reach and open the bottles,” McAdams said. (IANS)

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Kids with Autism More Likely to Be Bullied by Both Their Siblings and Their Peers

Children with autism experience difficulties with social interaction and communication, which may have implications

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The study, published in the journal Autism and Developmental Disorders, also found that children with autism are more likely to be both the victims and perpetrators of sibling bullying compared to those without autism. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Kids with autism are more likely to be bullied by both their siblings and their peers, meaning that when they return from school, they have no respite from victimisation, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Autism and Developmental Disorders, also found that children with autism are more likely to be both the victims and perpetrators of sibling bullying compared to those without autism.

“Children with autism experience difficulties with social interaction and communication, which may have implications for their relationships with siblings,” said study lead author Umar Toseeb from the University of York.

“From an evolutionary perspective, siblings may be considered competitors for parental resources such as affection, attention and material goods – children with autism might get priority access to these limited parental resources leading to conflict and bullying between siblings,” he said.

Kids, Autism, Bullied
Kids with autism are more likely to be bullied by both their siblings and their peers, meaning that when they return from school, they have no respite from victimisation, warn researchers. Pixabay

The researchers used data of over 8,000 children, more than 231 of which had autism, to investigate sibling bullying.

For the findings, the children were asked questions about how often they were picked on or hurt on purpose by their siblings and peers and how often they were the perpetrators of such acts.

The study revealed that, at the age of 11 years, two thirds of children with autism reported being involved in some form of sibling bullying.

While there was a decrease in bullying for children in both groups by the time they reached the age of 14 years, children with autism were still more likely to be involved in two-way sibling bullying, as a victim and a perpetrator.

Also Read- Pre-Schoolers with Symptoms of ADHD Take More Time to Be School-Ready

According to the researchers, children involved in sibling bullying, irrespective of whether they had autism or not, were more likely to experience emotional and behavioural difficulties both in the long- and short-term. (IANS)