Saturday November 23, 2019
Home Education Race Plays No...

Race Plays No Role in Language Skills Children Later Develop

It was found that maternal education played an important role in predicting the amount and quality of the mother's language use

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Race, Children, Language
Our findings represent a big shift from previous thinking that race-based differences in maternal language play a significant role in children's language outcomes. Pixabay

Researchers have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of words mothers use with their children or with the language skills children later develop.

Published in the journal Child Development, the study evaluated the language use of black mothers in comparison with white mothers with the same education levels to measure the amount and complexity of the words they use with their infants and young children.

“Our findings represent a big shift from previous thinking that race-based differences in maternal language play a significant role in children’s language outcomes,” said Mary Bratsch-Hines from University of North Carolina in the US.

The current study followed 1,292 children from birth and is part of the Family Life Project which focuses on disentangling race, socioeconomic status and educational attainment to better understand the factors that influence child outcomes.

Race, Children, Language
Researchers have discovered that race plays no role in the amount and quality of words mothers use with their children or with the language skills children later develop. Pixabay

Researchers measured the interactions between mothers and their children during four picture book interactions in the home between the ages of 6 and 36 months.

It was found that maternal education played an important role in predicting the amount and quality of the mother’s language use and the child’s language development.

Maternal education was very related to children’s later language at school age regardless of maternal race and that mothers’ early language input quality and complexity were even more related to children’s later language at school age, researchers said.

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This study is significant because earlier studies generally included parents with higher incomes who were primarily white and parents with lower incomes who were primarily black. As a result, educators and other child professionals were not able to distinguish between race, income or education as the cause of the language gap until now, they said. (IANS)

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Study Says, Social Media Use May Not Make Kids Depressed

Mental health is a multi-process syndrome, where no one stressor is likely to be the cause of depression or anxiety

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Social Media
According to the researchers, this increase d use of Social Media, though, did not predict future mental health. That is, adolescents' increase in social networking beyond their typical levels did not predict changes in anxiety or depression. Pixabay

The amount of time spent on Social Media is not directly adding to the anxiety or depression issues in teenagers, say reseachers from Brigham Young University.

The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, shows that it is not merely the amount of time spent on social media that’s leading to an increase in depression or anxiety among adolescents.

“We spent eight years trying to really understand the relationship between time spent on social media and depression for developing teenagers,” said study author Sarah Coyne, Professor at Brigham Young University in the US.

“If they increased their social media time, would it make them more depressed? Also, if they decreased their social media time, were they less depressed? The answer is no. We found that time spent on social media was not what was impacting anxiety or depression,” Coyne added.

Social Media
Researchers suggest some healthier ways to use Social Media: Be an active user instead of a passive user. Instead of just scrolling, actively comment, post and like other content. Pixabay

Mental health is a multi-process syndrome, where no one stressor is likely to be the cause of depression or anxiety.

For the study, researchers worked with 500 youth between the ages of 13 and 20, who completed once-yearly questionnaires over an eight-year span.

Social media use was measured by asking participants how much time they spent on social networking sites on a typical day.

To measure depression and anxiety, participants responded to questions with different scales to indicate depressive symptoms and anxiety levels.

These results were then analysed on an individual level to see if there was a strong correlation between the two variables.

At age 13, adolescents reported an average social networking use of 31-60 minutes per day.

Social Media
The amount of time spent on Social Media is not directly adding to the anxiety or depression issues in teenagers, say reseachers from Brigham Young University. Pixabay

These average levels increased steadily so that by young adulthood, they were reporting upwards of two hours per day.

According to the researchers, this increase of social networking, though, did not predict future mental health. That is, adolescents’ increase in social networking beyond their typical levels did not predict changes in anxiety or depression one year later.

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Researchers suggest some healthier ways to use Social Media: Be an active user instead of a passive user. Instead of just scrolling, actively comment, post and like other content.

Limit social media use at least an hour before falling asleep. Getting enough sleep is one of the most protective factors for mental health, the researchers said. (IANS)