Saturday April 4, 2020

Recognizing Signs of Depression | Lets Talk About It

Depression is more than just ‘low mood'- it is deeper than you think

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signs of depression
Feeling moody or low from time to time is normal, but depression is something entirely different. Pixabay

New Delhi, October 11, 2017 : Being unhappy is not synonymous with depression.

What is Depression?

Depression is a constant state of low mood and an aversion to activity that can alter a person’s thoughts, behavior, feelings and a sense of general well being. People suffering from depression may feel anxious, empty, helpless, worthless, hopeless, guilty, irritable, ashamed or restless – and sometimes all of this at the same time. These can largely be viewed as both outcome and signs of depression.

Feeling moody or low from time to time is normal; these are natural emotions which when experienced in regular intervals are healthy. However, some people experience these feelings deeply. And contrary to popular belief, they may not be able to ‘snap out of it’ for long periods that might last up to weeks, months or even years.  What is further a cause of concern is that sometimes, these behaviors and mood swings are without any apparent reason. While signs of depression may be hard to point, they are not entirely invisible.

Signs of Depression

Depression is more than just ‘low mood’- it is a serious situation that can affect an individual’s physical, mental and emotional health.

But how can we know that an individual may be suffering from depression, are there any warning signs of depression?

Feeling sad is a part of depression, but the illness can present itself in a variety of other ways. If observed closely, one can figure out signs of depression in people.

The following can be broadly understood as signs of depression that can motivate an individual to seek professional help,

1. BODY : You have unexplained pain

According to the Mayo Clinic, unexplained pain, for example, back aches or migraines can be one of the first or only signs of depression. In fact, pain and depression often comprise a complimentary relationship. If your depression is causing you pain, this can influence you to feel additionally depressed which may further the pain. In addition, this ‘unexplained’ pain can give rise to a host of other problems like stress, low confidence, restlessness and you may even face difficulties falling asleep.

2. SLEEP : You sleep excessively – or too little

According to experts and numerous researches published in health-related journals, sleeping for extended hours is interpreted as escapism behavior.

You may wind up in bed and feel like staying there for hours, take naps whenever you can during the day. Depression can force you to feel immobile. Or it can cause you to remain awake till late in the night-tossing and turning and worrying.

Sleeping too much or too less comes with its own set of drawbacks. You may feel worn out and drowsy from a lot of rest which can make you feel even more terrible. Unrest due to long sleep hours will make you likely to sleep more and thereafter face even more trouble falling asleep at night.

3. WEIGHT : Your eating patterns have changed

Depression can alter your life in more ways than one. While some symptoms will be easier to notice, you might not be able to point out others until a while. Depression can influence major parts of your life, like your dietary patterns.

You may encounter a loss of appetite and a diminished enthusiasm for all activities that involve food. It can also have the inverse impact, making you more likely to attempt to mitigate yourself by greedily consuming food. Furthermore, if you suddenly find yourself binge eating or indulging in junk food, you might need to speak with your specialist about depression.

4. COGNITIVE : You may feel confused

If you are experiencing trouble concentrating, or settling on choices on a practically regular routine, it could be a sign of depression. You may experience unfocused thinking, or wavering attention. This can in turn take a toll on your memory and the ability to make sound judgment.

Have you been looking for excuses to delay work? A confused mind may influence you to overlook work deadlines and also motivate you to forego errands. Worst case scenario, it may even lead you to engage in unhealthy and risky behavior.

5. MOOD : You may feel extremely emotional

Although it is a common viewpoint to associate depression with sadness, it can also manifest into a host of other experiences. Depression may make you feel disturbed or angry over things you would have ordinarily ignored. Or you might experience sudden emotional outburst – incessantly crying for no particular reason. You may feel distant and not be able to relate to activities and people who were previously a part of your routine.

If you find yourself indulging in extreme emotional behavior, you might actually be depressed.

– Prepeared by Soha Kala of NewsGram. Twitter : SohaKala

Next Story

Here’s Why Women with Psychiatric Disorders Are Less Likely to Have Second Child

This contrasts with 82 per cent of mothers who did not experience psychiatric problems.

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psychiatric disorders
Researchers have claimed that women who suffer from psychiatric disorders are less likely to go on to have more children. Pixabay

Researchers have claimed that women who suffer from psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia following the live birth of their first child are less likely to go on to have more children.

The study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that 69 per cent of women who experienced postpartum psychiatric disorders within the first six months after the birth of their first baby went on to have further children. This contrasts with 82 per cent of mothers who did not experience psychiatric problems.

“We wanted to explore whether women with postpartum psychiatric disorders had a reduced possibility of having a second child. Furthermore, we considered whether a reduction in the live birth rate was due to personal choices or decreased fertility, as these are important issues to consider,” said study lead author Xiaoqin Liu from Aarhus University in Denmark.

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For the findings, the research team analysed data from Danish registries for 414,571 women who had their first live birth between 1997 and 2015 in Denmark. They followed the women for a maximum of 19.5 years until the next live birth, emigration, death, their 45th birthday or June 2016, whichever occurred first.

They identified women with postpartum psychiatric disorders by seeing if they were given prescriptions for psychotropic medications or had hospital contact for psychiatric disorders during the first six months after the live birth of their first child.

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The study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that 69 per cent of women who experienced postpartum psychiatric disorders within the first six months after the birth of their first baby went on to have further children. Pixabay

A total of 4,327 (one per cent) of women experienced psychiatric disorders following the birth of their first child, according to the study. These women were a third less likely to have a second live birth compared to women who did not experience psychiatric disorders. If the first child died, the difference in subsequent live birth rates disappeared.

However, if the psychiatric problem required hospitalisation, the likelihood of a woman having a second child nearly halved and this remained the case irrespective of whether the first child survived or not.

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“Although fewer women with postpartum psychiatric disorders had subsequent children, it is noteworthy that about 69 per cent of these women still chose to have a second child,” Dr Liu said.

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“For the remaining 31 per cent of women, we need to differentiate the reasons why they did not have another child. If they avoided another pregnancy due to fear of relapse, an important clinical message to them is that prevention of relapse is possible,” Liu added.

The researchers said that other possible explanations for the reduction in the subsequent live birth rate may be that women with postpartum psychiatric disorders are less able to conceive or have more problematic relationships with partners. (IANS)