Sunday November 17, 2019

People Who Take Cholesterol-Lowering Statins are at Higher Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

More than a quarter of middle-aged adults use a cholesterol-lowering drug, according to estimates

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diabetes, menstruation
Each year of delay in menarche age correlated with a six per cent lower risk of Type-2 diabetes. Pixabay

People who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at twice the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a new study.

Statins are a class of drugs that can lower cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. More than a quarter of middle-aged adults use a cholesterol-lowering drug, according to estimates.

The study, published in the Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews journal, found that statin users had more than double the risk of diagnosis compared to those who didn’t take the drugs. Those who took the cholesterol-lowering drugs for more than two years had more than three times the risk of diabetes.

“The fact that increased duration of statin use was associated with an increased risk of diabetes – something we call a dose-dependent relationship – makes us think that this is likely a causal relationship,” said the study’s lead author Victoria Zigmont, a graduate student at the Ohio State University.

Research, Cholesterol, Diabetes
People who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at twice the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Pixabay

“Statins are very effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. I would never recommend that people stop taking the statin they’ve been prescribed based on this study, but it should open up further discussions about diabetes prevention,” Zigmont added.

For the study, the researchers included over 4,000 men and women who did not have diabetes, were candidates for statins based on heart disease risk and had not yet taken the drugs at the start of the study. About 16 per cent of the group – 755 patients – were eventually prescribed statins during the study period.

Researchers also found that statin users were 6.5 percent more likely to have a troublingly high HbA1c value – a routine blood test for diabetes that estimates average blood sugar over several months.

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“Although statins have clear benefits in appropriate patients, scientists and clinicians should further explore the impact of statins on human metabolism, in particular the interaction between lipid and carbohydrate metabolism,” said co-author Steven Clinton, a Professor at the varsity. (IANS)

Next Story

Young People Diagnosed with Diabetes May Experience High Stress Levels

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years

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Stress
Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever, Otherwise it leads to Stress. Pixabay

Young people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes causing High Stress Levels and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

Age plays a critical role in the well-being of people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

“We found we can evaluate a patient’s initial stress and predict how they will be doing six months later,” said Vicki Helgeson, professor of psychology at the university.

“If you can identify people who are facing diabetes distress earlier, you can intervene and prevent their health from declining,” said the findings published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years.

They found younger patients (42 years and younger) experienced higher diabetes-related and psychological distress.

In addition, patients with higher education and income expressed more stress.

Conversely, older patients (older than 64 years) had less psychological stress and greater consistency in self-care, blood sugar control and medication adherence.

Stress
Young people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes causing High Stress Levels and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University. Pixabay

Patients in long-term relationships also reported less diabetes stress.

Patients identified diet as the greatest stressor (38 per cent).

Other significant stressors include checking blood sugar (8 per cent) and experiencing high or low blood sugar events (7 per cent).

Patients who self-reported greater stress also reported greater depressed mood, less adherence to medication and higher anxiety.

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“Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever,” Helgeson said. “Life gets in the way of sticking to a diabetes regimen.” (IANS)