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Ruskin Bond is one of the most celebrated Indian writers across the globe. Wikimedia commons

A wordsmith who has always celebrated love, author Ruskin Bond says he cringes at times seeing the “crudity” with which women are written or spoken about now, also stressing that children today have lost their innocence.

Hot on the heels of young cricketers, who are treated as icons by children in the Indian households, Hardik Pandya and Lokesh Rahul bandying about sexist remarks in a television show and making all the wrong noises for that, Bond said he is aware that the general tone when talking about women has gone hoarse.


“Children are losing their innocence or have already lost it because of the climate they are exposed to,” Bond, 84, told IANS in an interview on the sidelines of the TATA Steel Kolkata Literary Meet.


Children are losing their innocence or have already lost it because of the climate they are exposed to, Pixabay

“The books they read sometimes maybe talk of love and love making in a bold manner which might border on crudity,” he said.

“You see 12-year olds watching hard porn on the streets and that was unthinkable during our time. We did not have easy access to so many things during our day.

“So I think too much exposure to a lot of things early on and not seeing or reading the right kinds of things has lead to this,” said the creator of “The Room on the Roof” (1956), “Our Trees Still Grow in Dehra” (1992), “The Blue Umbrella” (1974) and “A Flight of Pigeons” (2003).

Bond also chose to speak specifically on the Pandya-Rahul issue, underlining that they should think twice before going to such talk shows and that they should be given a second chance.

“I think they did make a mistake and such talk shows should be avoided as I feel it is also responsible for the way they behaved. They got carried away. Anyway, I read what all is going on and I feel we should not be too hard on them.”


Children increasingly identify with stories having human characters. Pixabay

Bond, whose supernatural stories have been made into a web series, said it is a way to stay relevant in today’s times, adding that ghosts are not out to scare or harm people all the time and it’s a “safe fear” that people like to indulge in.

“You can think of it that way (web series helps in staying relevant). It might help because in any case, those people, people who read, young people, many of them do enjoy reading ghost stories and tales of the supernatural as I did when I was a boy.

Also Read: Proud Of Spreading Chills And Thrills Among Children: ‘Goosebumps’ Author R.L. Stine

“And, of course, it’s only a part of my writing output, but I enjoy doing the ghost story or spooky story and particularly when I run out of other ideas because I can cook them up quite easily.

“Especially your hill stations are reputed to be full of them,” said Bond who lives in Landour, Mussoorie, with his adopted family.

The first episode of “Parchayee: Ghost Stories by Ruskin Bond” premiered earlier this month and the subsequent parts will unfold till June. (IANS)


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WASHINGTON — U.S. federal law enforcement agencies and Europol announced dozens of arrests to break up a global operation that sold illegal drugs using a shadowy realm of the internet.

At a Department of Justice news conference Tuesday in Washington, officials said they arrested 150 people for allegedly selling illicit drugs, including fake prescription opioids and cocaine, over the so-called darknet. Those charged are alleged to have carried out tens of thousands of illegal sales using a part of the internet that is accessible only by using specialized anonymity tools.

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Currently, when users set up WhatsApp Pay in India, the service only verifies the phone number linked to your bank account to enable UPI-based transactions

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Practising good nail hygiene involves following a systematic process to ensure the longevity of our nail health.

By Rajesh U. Pandya

Although the world is recovering from coronavirus pandemic, we must not lower our guards and stay alert when it comes to hand hygiene to curb the spread of the deadly virus. But are we paying sufficient attention to our nail hygiene? Our nails are the index of well-being for our entire body. The manifestations of several critical diseases were first detected within the dirty nails.

The ignorance towards our nails becomes the breeding ground of harmful bacteria. These germs enter our body through our hands because in India we eat through our bare hands. Therefore, nail hygiene is crucial and without it hand hygiene is incomplete.

Practising good nail hygiene involves following a systematic process to ensure the longevity of our nail health. It includes ensuring that food particles, dirt and dust are not sticking to our nails and there is no build-up of nail bacteria. Thankfully, contrary to popular belief, it is not that difficult to maintain good nail hygiene. A little diligence, awareness and attention are sufficient to keep our nails healthy.

Avoiding nail hygiene makes you prone to viral infections
Due to constant negligence towards the cleanliness of the nails, many serious issues like bacterial and viral infections arise. Often these lead to serious health problems. Our hand hygiene is not perfect till the time we clean the undersides of our nails besides washing hands regularly. Most people don't mind sharing nail clippers with others. This is however an extremely unhygienic practice. When we don't share any of our personal hygiene products then why do we share our nail clippers? Nails harbour abundant germs, bacteria and viruses and sharing nail clippers is equivalent to exchanging those microorganisms.

microscopic organisms Nails harbour abundant germs, bacteria and viruses and sharing nail clippers is equivalent to exchanging those microorganisms.| Photo by CDC on Unsplash

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