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credits: tribune.com.pk

credits: fashionlingua.blogspot.com

credits: fashionlingua.blogspot.com

New Delhi: Huma Nassr, widely known as the first Pakistani entrepreneur in India, is set to launch a Shaan-e-Pakistan event at the country’s high commission where fashion designers from the two countries will share the stage in a cross-border cultural exchange rising above starchy political and official ties between the two countries.


“Designers from India and Pakistan will share the stage and exchange ideas as well. It will not be limited to the fashion only, but food and other trade items will also be showcased,” Nassr told a media outlet at her ‘raahtii’ outlet in the capital’s Greater Kailash here. Nassr has a similar outlet in Karachi.

“I want the people of both the countries to share their culture and improve relations.” The September 10 event would be held in association with the Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO).

“These are initiatives taken by commoners and we appreciate them. Cultural exchanges would be helpful to improve the relations between our people,” Pakistan High Commission officials told the media outlet, while not wishing to be identified citing diplomatic rules.

Nassr has been traveling in and living in India for two years and feels this country is her second home. “I never feel unsafe here. I love to introduce my culture to the people here and I also take back Indian culture to Pakistan.”

Nassr’s work is a fusion of traditional Rajasthani and Larkani (Sindhi) designs. “Shaan-e-Pakistan will not stop here. We will take it to Pakistan and showcase Indian varieties there,” Nassr said.

Indian diplomats, politicians, musicians and artists would be a part of the launch event, which would be followed by a fashion show at The Grand hotel here.(IANS)


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