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Dr. Mosley "provides a fascinating and detailed understanding of the secrets of this corona-virus in the book. Pixabay

From award-winning science journalist Dr. Michael Mosley, comes “Covid-19: What you need to know about the CORONAVIRUS and the race for the vaccine” that traces the greatest public health threat of our time as it charts the trajectory of the virus from its emergence in China at the end of 2019 to its rapid worldwide spread.

Based on the latest scientific discoveries, Dr. Mosley “provide ‘the Story of Covid-19’ s a fascinating and detailed understanding of the secrets of this corona-virus, how it spreads, how it infects your body and how your immune system tries to fight back”, its publisher, Simon & Schuster India, said. The book also contains plenty of accessible, practical advice on how to ward off infection and look after both your mental and physical health during isolation.


With access to leading experts, Dr Mosley reports on the battle to find treatments and a safe and effective vaccine (ultimately, the only way to defeat the virus), armed with which you’ll be in a better position to protect yourself and your family as the world begins to reopen.


The book also contains plenty of accessible, practical advice on how to ward off the infection and look after both your mental and physical health during isolation. Pixabay

Dr Mathew Vadas, Professor of Medicine and leading immunologist, Centenary Institute and University of Sydney, says of the book: “This is an incredibly readable summary of the latest research. A magical mixture of scientific realism and reasoned hope.” The author trained as a doctor before becoming a journalist and television presenter. He is the #1 bestselling author of “The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet”, “The Clever Guts Diet”, “The Fast 800” and “Fast Asleep”. This is the second book in India on the history, evolution, facts and myths around the coronavirus.

Also Read: Sharpen Your English Language Skills at Home With these Amazing Books

The previous book, “The Coronavirus: What you Need to Know about the Global Pandemic” has been written by Dr. Rajesh M. Parikh, Director of Medical Research and Honorary Neuropsychiatrist at the Jaslok Hospital & Research Centre, Mumbai; Dr Swapneil Parikh, a practicing physician in Mumbai and the co-founder of healthcare start-up; and Maherra Desai, a clinical psychologist and medical researcher. (IANS)


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