Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Would be wonderful to work on film for kids: Sonakshi Sinha. (Wikimedia Commons)

Actress Sonakshi Sinha, who has often been body-shamed, says it is important for the audience to rise above looks and delve deeper into an artiste’s work.

Sonakshi is all for the fact that one’s work speaks for itself.


The actress, who walked the ramp at the launch of Streax Professional’s Spring Summer 2018 Collection ‘Marigold’ in an orange floor-sweepimg gown, on Tuesday told IANS: “We should tell the audience and honestly that is something I have advocated since the starting of my career.”


Sonakshi Sinha (Wikimedia Commons)

“I have always been projecting a very strong body image. Being true to yourself… I have been bodyshamed quite a bit but moving ahead of that because that is what I have always believed in…That it’s not how you look but how you do and about how many people you reach out to,” she added.

While the media here waited for a conversation with the actress, who had flown in from Kuala Lumpur to be a part of the event, there was chatter about Sonakshi’s weight loss and “sculpted body”.

Don’t such comments and questions on weight annoy her?

Also Read: Top 10 Best Movies of Sonakshi Sinha

“I have been answering questions on my weight loss for so long that I have become indifferent to them. There are certain things that seem odd at the moment, but I am kind of used to it,” said Sonakshi.

“And it’s okay, it’s part of my profession. These are very basic things that people are interested in, which is why they ask. They are I guess, the most obvious questions,” added the actress, who will next be seen in “Happy Phirr Bhaag Jaayegi”, “Kalank” and “Dabangg 3”. (BollywoodCountry)


Popular

Unsplash

NASA has launched the 'Deep Space Food Challenge'.

NASA will pay up to $1 million to people who can come up with innovative and sustainable food production ideas to feed astronauts in space, as the US space agency prepares to send astronauts further into the cosmos than ever before. Giving future explorers the technology to produce nutritious, tasty, and satisfying meals on long-duration space missions will give them the energy required to uncover the great unknown. In coordination with the Canadian Space Agency, NASA has launched the 'Deep Space Food Challenge' that calls on teams to design, build, and demonstrate prototypes of food production technologies that provide tangible nutritional products -- or food.

Also Read : NASA introduces 18 astronauts for Lunar program

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

People with moderate or greater symptoms of depression were more likely to believe at least 1 of 4 false statements about Covid-19 vaccines.

People suffering from depression are more likely to believe vaccine-related misinformation, according to a new study. The study found that people with moderate or greater symptoms of depression were more likely to believe at least 1 of 4 false statements about Covid-19 vaccines.

Those who believed the statements to be true were half as likely to be vaccinated, the study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, indicated. 'It is clear the pandemic has taken a heavy toll on the mental health of Americans, especially young people," said researcher Katherine Ognyanova from Rutgers University, the US.

woman sitting on black chair in front of glass-panel window with white curtains People suffering from depression are more likely to believe vaccine-related misinformation. | Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

It is estimated that millions of pieces of space debris orbit around Earth.

The space economy is on track to be valued at a trillion dollars by the end of 2030, but assets such as navigation, weather and communication satellites that serve our society daily are threatened by space debris, an Indian-American professor has stressed. According to NASA, it is estimated that millions of pieces of space debris orbit around Earth. A major portion of these objects as well as active satellites reside in the low-Earth orbit region, at altitudes between 200 km and 1,000 km. In November last year, Russia destroyed one of its own satellites with a ground-based missile, creating thousands of pieces of debris that passed through the International Space Station (ISS).

Also Read : Scientists to predict space weather faster

Keep reading... Show less