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Spix’s Macaw Parrot from Brazil Is Now Extinct

In the 2011 movie, Blu was raised in captivity and travels from Minnesota to Brazil with his owner to repopulate his species with the last wild female of their kind, Jewel.

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Spix's Macaw
Spix's Macaw, Brazilian parrot extinct in wild. Flickr
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A new study has found the Spix’s macaw of Brazil has become extinct in the wild. The bird achieved onscreen fame as an animated character in the Disney movie “Rio” as a charming parrot named Blu.

The Spix’s macaw is one of eight bird species, half of them in Brazil, confirmed extinct or suspected extinct in the report from BirdLife International published on Sunday, reports CNN.

But 60 to 80 Spix’s macaws still live in captivity.

Spix's Macaw
Spix’s Macaw. Flickr

Deforestation is a leading cause of the Spix’s macaw’s disappearance from its natural habitat, according to the report.

For the first time, extinctions on the mainland are outpacing those on islands, it said.

“Ninety per cent of bird extinctions in recent centuries have been of species on islands,” said Stuart Butchart, BirdLife’s chief scientist and the paper’s lead author.

“However, our results confirm that there is a growing wave of extinctions sweeping across the continents, driven mainly by habitat loss and degradation from unsustainable agriculture and logging.”

 

Spix's Macaw
Poster of the Disney Movie ‘Rio 2’.

 

In the 2011 movie, Blu was raised in captivity and travels from Minnesota to Brazil with his owner to repopulate his species with the last wild female of their kind, Jewel.

Also Read: Thousands of Live Animals, Meat, Ivory, Seized In Illegal Trade: Interpol

But the movie was 11 years too late, the study found, as Jewel likely would have died in 2000. (IANS)

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IWC Shuts Down A Proposal To Create A Sanctuary For South Atlantic Whales

The issue has fractured the IWC for decades and there appears to be no room for compromise on either side.

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An effort to create a safe haven for whales in the South Atlantic was defeated Tuesday at the meeting of the (IWC) in Brazil.

The proposal, which was introduced by Brazil in 2001, received support from 39 countries but was opposed by 25, denying it the three-quarters’ majority it needed to pass.

Environmental organizations and conservationists had argued that the sanctuary would not only keep the mammoth mammals safe from hunting, but also protect them from getting entangled in fishing gear or being struck by ships.

But pro-whaling nations, led by Japan, argued there was no need for the sanctuary because no countries were conducting commercial whale hunting in the South Atlantic.

IWC
The South Atlantic Whale. Pixabay

Brazilian Environmental Minister Edson Duarte vowed to push to get the proposal passed at future meetings of the IWC.

“We will work in other meetings of this commission this year to ensure that the sanctuary will finally be created,” Duarte said.

Pro-whaling nations, including Japan, Iceland and Norway, are pushing for resumption of sustainable hunting of whales and are unlikely to allow for the creation of a sanctuary unless their demand is met.

IWC
The proposal, which was introduced by Brazil in 2001, received support from 39 countries but was opposed by 25.

 

Japan, which has pushed for an amendment to the ban for years, accuses the IWC of siding with anti-whaling nations rather than trying to reach a compromise between conservationists and whalers.

 

Also Read: Asia’s Increase In Consumption of Meat to Cause Environmental Problems: Researchers

The issue has fractured the IWC for decades and there appears to be no room for compromise on either side.

The conference ends Sept. 14. (VOA)